Swamp plot question.

Hey All.

I have a new plot that I recently put in and have a section of woods that adjoins it. I was debating using this other section of timber to create more plot. The section of timber lines a typical tag alder swamp and consists of mostly mature fir (so not much timber value). It does get wet at certain times of the year, but normally is dry during the summer/fall seasons until snow. However, if you dig down you do reach very dark mucky water logged soil (about 5-6”). Just curious for input on should I go the food plot way or turn it into bedding. Soil sample was just mailed out.
 

Drycreek

Well-Known Member
I don’t have a clue about Maine, but in Texas that would make a good clover plot. One of my best clover plots on my old place was one that you had to be careful in after a rain. Been stuck on top of the ground in my golf cart a couple times. Didn’t take much to get it there either, but it sure did grow that clover !
 

MarkDarvin

Well-Known Member
If you need more food, I'd make food. If you need more cover, I'd make cover. If the spot isn't serving a wildlife purpose change it.

That being said, I've got soil like that, and it's perfect for white clover as a primary crop. My best clover comes up under water each spring. You'll appreciate that soggy soil when the drought hits. Be careful with heavy equipment though. If you squeeze out all the air, your soggy spot will turn into a pond.
 

Drycreek

Well-Known Member
If you need more food, I'd make food. If you need more cover, I'd make cover. If the spot isn't serving a wildlife purpose change it.

That being said, I've got soil like that, and it's perfect for white clover as a primary crop. My best clover comes up under water each spring. You'll appreciate that soggy soil when the drought hits. Be careful with heavy equipment though. If you squeeze out all the air, your soggy spot will turn into a pond.


Mine was next to a creek, and on a heavy rain, it would flood. It never hurt the clover as the creek would go down about as fast as it came up. Imagine my surprise though, when one afternoon as I was sitting in my deer stand I see a pair of wood ducks swimming through my clover plot !
 

MarkDarvin

Well-Known Member
Mine was next to a creek, and on a heavy rain, it would flood. It never hurt the clover as the creek would go down about as fast as it came up. Imagine my surprise though, when one afternoon as I was sitting in my deer stand I see a pair of wood ducks swimming through my clover plot !
I've jumped mallards out of mine too.
 

George

Well-Known Member
That kind of anaerobic muck soil will never be any good at growing anything other than what grows there now, alder and reed canary grass.

G
 

Chainsaw

Well-Known Member
That kind of anaerobic muck soil will never be any good at growing anything other than what grows there now, alder and reed canary grass.

G
It sounds like a possible white cedar candidate which is cover and late season food.
 
That kind of anaerobic muck soil will never be any good at growing anything other than what grows there now, alder and reed canary grass.

G

There is no Reed Canary or Alders in this section. There are in the swamp that it backs into though. It’s all fir, maple, and the random oak.
 

Flo1919

Member
I plant two swamp plots with Rye every year. Some years it gets rained out, most years it’s good through our season. Nuttalls are growing well in them as well.
 
In maryland to my surprise I'm able to grow Austrian winter peas very well in my low lying land.
This land gets washed out from the stream running over during heavy storms, up to five times a year. Benefits of the washout include moving leaves for good soil contact.

I think the trick is planting the peas when the leaves first start falling off the trees.
Planting them much sooner, I am afraid that they will not germinate well without enough sun light?
 
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