So if it's not poison sumac...

KDdid

Active Member
I was reasonably sure that this was a clump of poison sumac until the green berries turned red, not white. Now I'm puzzled.
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KDdid

Active Member
Here's some more pictures. The stems are not hollow, but solidly woody. The berries are small and very dry looking since turning red. Leaves are compound , opposite, pinnate. The bark is gray with light gray mottling. Oh, and it's thorny along the branches.
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KDdid

Active Member
So after verifying the ID, I reached out electronically to a forager from Michigan who I've come to respect. She is well versed in medicinal as well as edible plants, and prickly ash is both. Known for it's analgesic properties, it was used regularly as a toothache remedy by native tribes in North America. I tried chewing some of the seed hulls, which have a lemony flavor. Within seconds my tongue was tingling, followed by a numbing effect. Cool stuff.
 

Native Hunter

Well-Known Member
So after verifying the ID, I reached out electronically to a forager from Michigan who I've come to respect. She is well versed in medicinal as well as edible plants, and prickly ash is both. Known for it's analgesic properties, it was used regularly as a toothache remedy by native tribes in North America. I tried chewing some of the seed hulls, which have a lemony flavor. Within seconds my tongue was tingling, followed by a numbing effect. Cool stuff.

Don't smoke that stuff or you might be singing, "Mama told me not to come..." :D
 
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