300 Blackout

birdgunner

Member
I completely agree, the Barnes Vor-TX 110g is the round to use for this caliber for hunting. Haven't been let down with it.
 

MK111

Member
The 300 BO is a great caliber in it's own class. Use it for what's designed for and it won't fail.
I do R&D work for a ammo company and have developed loads, formed cases for the 300 BO in 125 gr and 220 gr suppressed loads. Found out only one powder would work well with the 200 gr suppressed loads
Have access to a 300 BO rifle and waiting for the suppressor.
I've done 10,000's for case forming but it's on their back burner now. So I only do load development for new powders.
 

Jason Broom

Well-Known Member
No matter how you slice it, the 300BO isn't as powerful or versatile (for big game hunting) as a 30/30. It is only by virtue of light-for-caliber bullets of specific construction that it is really suitable for big game at all. Even then, the shots should be very carefully selected and placed, making this a cartridge suited to experienced hunters who can shoot very well, even when under pressure. I know it isn't a popular stance to take, but I feel this cartridge is a poor choice for younger shooters.
 

Doe Shooter

Active Member
No matter how you slice it, the 300BO isn't as powerful or versatile (for big game hunting) as a 30/30. It is only by virtue of light-for-caliber bullets of specific construction that it is really suitable for big game at all. Even then, the shots should be very carefully selected and placed, making this a cartridge suited to experienced hunters who can shoot very well, even when under pressure. I know it isn't a popular stance to take, but I feel this cartridge is a poor choice for younger shooters.
Agree. Shot placement is critical. Small deer only. Larger bodied deer really show it's weakness.
 

birdgunner

Member
I can see where some may feel the blackout is under powered and I am contemplating moving my son up to either a 6.5 or .243 next year to help compensate for the inevitable longer distances and flatter trajectory but last night for our youth hunt he proved yet again the 300 is definitely up to the task as he dropped a nice doe in her tracks at 135 yards and painted the ground.
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Not to obfuscate the obvious but everything comes down to shot placement regardless of caliber or projectile. Perfect example, last year a buddy shot a yearling doe in the neck with a 300 win mag, she ran off 80 yards and luckily he saw her lay down but still very much alive and put another round in her to finish her off. The 300 win mag has over 2.5x the energy as the 300 blackout but if you don't have proper shot placement it doesn't amount to much.
 

Doe Shooter

Active Member
Not to put too fine a point on this, I must respectfully disagree. The primary advantage of chambering's .30 and below is the effect of hydro-static shock. Certainly game will be taken with a .30 hole poked through them with out hydro-static shock, however, a .50 -.70 hole will shorten the blood trail in addition to be a bit more forgiving on shot placement. I believe the missing component is hydro-static shock with the Whisper. I might add I have witnessed a double lunged doe travel 200 yards after the shot. I like the round. But no longer use it on deer.
Just my experience and my opinion.
 

birdgunner

Member
Doe Shooter, I ask this out of respectful sincerity and as an attempt to learn and gain a better understanding from others experiences, how many deer have you shot vs recovered with the blackout?
I completely follow what you are saying regarding the shock factor, when I hit a deer in the shoulder with my 270 WSM it instantly folds and drops, with the blackout it drops but will kick for a second or two.
When you say a .5-.70" hole, what round are you using on deer?
 

Chestnut Valley Farms

Active Member
I have a 300 blackout in Ruger ranch rifle platform. Coupled with a YHM suppressor propelling a 208gr subsonic Amax it is very enjoyable gun. Plan to hunt with it some this year
 
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MK111

Member
Out of respect for the 300 Whisper - 300 BO I believe was designed to be a short range Special Ops man killer with heavy weight suppressed loads. Put it into that use I'm sure it preforms perfectly.
Put the round into a long range game taker and it may not preform up to our desires.
 

Doe Shooter

Active Member
Doe Shooter, I ask this out of respectful sincerity and as an attempt to learn and gain a better understanding from others experiences, how many deer have you shot vs recovered with the blackout?
I completely follow what you are saying regarding the shock factor, when I hit a deer in the shoulder with my 270 WSM it instantly folds and drops, with the blackout it drops but will kick for a second or two.
When you say a .5-.70" hole, what round are you using on deer?
.5 Saboted muzzle loader( in this case savage 10ML ,300 gr .458 Barnes original bonded, harvester crush rib sabot, 59.5 gr. VV N120 smokeless, 2450 fps) .
.7 Hand loaded 12 gauge SPW HAMMER HEAD, http://slugsrus.com/product94.html, 1500fps.

Illinois makes provisions for hand gun hunting but not centerfire rifles. Handgun Cartridge can be straight walled or bottle neck cases not to exceed I believe 1.5". We had 15" barrels on the T/C'S. Or shotguns with slugs. Rifled shotgun barrels with sabot round are the other popular choice to poke big holes as are muzzle loaders.

With two of us using them since the first January handgun only doe season in 91 or 92 ,looking at the pictures in excess of 20 deer. Going only by memory we lost at least 5 , some even in the snow when the blood petered out. Like you we learned shoulder shots were best. I quit using it in favor of the.357/.44 Baines Davis in the early 2000's. Rules also changed to allow hand guns and long guns during all seasons . So we using it more for blood trailing /coup de grace weapon with a front of chest carry holster.

Still have the barrel,dies etc for the T/C. Load mostly 190gr cast gas checked for fox,yotes, trapline dispatching. Cheap to shoot.
 
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Doe Shooter

Active Member
Out of respect for the 300 Whisper - 300 BO I believe was designed to be a short range Special Ops man killer with heavy weight suppressed loads. Put it into that use I'm sure it preforms perfectly.
Put the round into a long range game taker and it may not preform up to our desires.

http://www.quarterbore.com/300whisper/sskwhisper.html
Here is the genesis of the whisper. J.D. Jones of SSK Industries is widely accepted as it's father in the early 90's along with many other great chamberings.
He originally envisioned it as a suppressed sniper round. It met with some popularity in the silhouette circles because it was stable throughout it's flight and not encumbered by the transitional shock from super sonic to subsonic in flight.
 

birdgunner

Member
.5 Saboted muzzle loader( in this case savage 10ML ,300 gr .458 Barnes original bonded, harvester crush rib sabot, 59.5 gr. VV N120 smokeless, 2450 fps) .
.7 Hand loaded 12 gauge SPW HAMMER HEAD, http://slugsrus.com/product94.html, 1500fps.
I quit using it in favor of the.357/.44 Baines Davis in the early 2000's. Rules also changed to allow hand guns and long guns during all seasons . So we using it more for blood trailing /coup de grace weapon with a front of chest carry holster.

Still have the barrel,dies etc for the T/C. Load mostly 190gr cast gas checked for fox,yotes, trapline dispatching. Cheap to shoot.

Ahhh, slugs, pistol (and Ill. rules) never crossed my mind regarding the larger calibers...makes sense now.
If you haven't tried out the Barnes 110gr tx on a deer, definitely recommend having a second look as I have heard similar stories from individuals who tried the 300 when it first came out and thought it was a marginal at best round and have since stated that the new loads were game changers. I don't have that long of a history with it and have only known it since the more current loads have been available but so far we have a 100% recovery rate and connecting with bone appears to be key with the Barnes load as ironically the one deer shot in the heart ran the furthest.
 

Doe Shooter

Active Member
Ahhh, slugs, pistol (and Ill. rules) never crossed my mind regarding the larger calibers...makes sense now.
If you haven't tried out the Barnes 110gr tx on a deer, definitely recommend having a second look as I have heard similar stories from individuals who tried the 300 when it first came out and thought it was a marginal at best round and have since stated that the new loads were game changers. I don't have that long of a history with it and have only known it since the more current loads have been available but so far we have a 100% recovery rate and connecting with bone appears to be key with the Barnes load as ironically the one deer shot in the heart ran the furthest.
Been using Barnes 110gr X for many years. It works best when you pass it through some kind of bone. Just my experience and opinion.When we first started using it the early 90's ,bullet selection was limited. The Barnes was there almost from the beginning.Agree soft tissue hits = long trailing. Used lil gun, w296,h110,vv110,vv120 with vv110 working best for me.
 
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E_308

Well-Known Member
Not to obfuscate the obvious but everything comes down to shot placement regardless of caliber or projectile. Perfect example, last year a buddy shot a yearling doe in the neck with a 300 win mag, she ran off 80 yards and luckily he saw her lay down but still very much alive and put another round in her to finish her off. The 300 win mag has over 2.5x the energy as the 300 blackout but if you don't have proper shot placement it doesn't amount to much.

The only deer I have ever shot with a rifle and lost was an average size doe with a 300 win mag and 180 grain accubond bullets at about 100 yards. The only thing I could figure was I hit a stick or something in transit. Bled for a while but couldn't find her. As I said in my original post I have killed enough deer with a 223 to know if you poke a hole in the right spot they will fall over. With more youth seasons around the country and kids getting in to hunting at younger ages I would almost bet there are more first time hunters using 223's than 30-30's. Looking at the numbers the 300 BO has to perform better than the 223 that I set out to replace. As the kid gets bigger and ranges get longer I will get him a "real" deer rifle.
 

E_308

Well-Known Member
Wish I could say I've only lost one deer.If you hunt long enough ,you'll lose one once in a while.

25 years and counting (with 1 - 3 firearm deer per year most years). I have lost a couple with a bow in the past 10 years or so.

I have shot deer with a 223, 22-250, 243, 270, 7 RM, 30-30, 308, 30-06, 300 WM, 44 mag, 50 cal muzzleloader, and the bow. Not bragging just saying the kid is just starting out - I have seen a gut pile or two.;)
 

UGAMike

New Member
my personnel experience with the 300 BO. (AAC 9" Upper with AAC SDN-6 suppressor)

1. With a subsonic 220gr HP from Remington, I took a suppressed shot at a nice 10pt from just over 100 yards. Based on what I felt I read on the ballistics, it should have been more than enough. Well, even though it was suppressed, there was still the first round pop, and what normally should have been a nicely placed heart shot, the deer bucked from the crack of discharge jumped forward and I ended up with a gut shot due to the 1100fps round. spend the next 6 hours tracking to never finding the deer. Made me sick to say the least.

2. I now only use the subsonic rounds for pig hunting and only head shots. I will say that the round has incredible energy and penetration. Just not the shock as you would get with a typical faster round.(for example, 220gr supsonic rounds will not set of tannerite) I have taken several pigs this way, but always now keep in mind how slow the round is to get the maximum benefit shooting suppressed to reduce wildlife disturbance.

3. I also have some 300 BO supersponic rounds that I hope to have my 9 year old harvest his first deer. With its reduced recoil and suppressed should make for a comfortable/confidence round for a child.
 

Kabic

Active Member
my personnel experience with the 300 BO. (AAC 9" Upper with AAC SDN-6 suppressor)

1. With a subsonic 220gr HP from Remington, I took a suppressed shot at a nice 10pt from just over 100 yards. Based on what I felt I read on the ballistics, it should have been more than enough. Well, even though it was suppressed, there was still the first round pop, and what normally should have been a nicely placed heart shot, the deer bucked from the crack of discharge jumped forward and I ended up with a gut shot due to the 1100fps round. spend the next 6 hours tracking to never finding the deer. Made me sick to say the least.

2. I now only use the subsonic rounds for pig hunting and only head shots. I will say that the round has incredible energy and penetration. Just not the shock as you would get with a typical faster round.(for example, 220gr supsonic rounds will not set of tannerite) I have taken several pigs this way, but always now keep in mind how slow the round is to get the maximum benefit shooting suppressed to reduce wildlife disturbance.

3. I also have some 300 BO supersponic rounds that I hope to have my 9 year old harvest his first deer. With its reduced recoil and suppressed should make for a comfortable/confidence round for a child.

Something seems to be off with the math here... I think the speed of sound is 1125.33 feet per second, if the bullet was 1100 feet per second that doesn't give the deer much time to react to the sound before he his hit by the bullet.
 

UGAMike

New Member
temp and humidity are also a factor. my original post of 1100fps was an estimate....but just checked the remington site. the chart states 1050fps for their 220 subsonic rounds.
 
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