Finally !

Discussion in 'Food Plots for Wildlife' started by Drycreek, Oct 12, 2020.

  1. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    I got my last two plots planted today, after a couple weeks of frustration. (It’s not quite over). A couple weeks ago I started to the property I hunt about 90 miles from home, had a water leak that I was unaware of on my F350 and going up a long hill several miles from home the engine got pretty hot. I had some water and 50/50 antifreeze, added that and made it down there ok.

    I took it to my mechanic, he found the leak in a heater hose and it was dripping out about the same place the a/c drips, which is why I could never see it. I guess getting hot galled a cylinder wall, because my engine blew on that same hill Saturday morning. Got a wrecker to carry my truck to my mechanic, a friend of my son pulled my tractor and trailer back home and I got a friend of mine to move it to the property yesterday. I went down there early this morning and planted two 1/2 acre plots with wheat.


    Now, just a small matter of $15K to $18K to put another engine in it. When it rains, it do pour ! And speaking of rain, I need some on these plots ! 5D705DBD-3613-4B48-9117-C002EF89C118.jpeg
     
    davidhelmly, Triple C and DocHolladay like this.
  2. OkieKubota

    OkieKubota Moderator Staff Member

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    Equipment failures are the worst! Hopefully Texas and Oklahoma gets some rain soon.
     
  3. DocHolladay

    DocHolladay Well-Known Member

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    Surprised y’all didn’t get anything off of Delta. It rained for 2 days in Tennessee from it.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  4. Jeff H

    Jeff H Well-Known Member

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    ...and Missouri, don't forget about Missouri!!
     
  5. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    We got a little drizzle. My buddy about 30 miles east of me got .2”. Baker got more than he needed. “Into each life a little rain must fall.” But when ?o_O
     
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  6. KSQ2

    KSQ2 Well-Known Member

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    Awaiting a good rain in Kansas as well...
     
  7. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    15K for a powerstroke engine? Sounds like you need a cheaper mechanic... What year truck is it?
     
  8. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    It’s an ‘08, the dreaded 6.4. I didn’t know about the 6.0 and the 6.4 as what they were until after I had bought one. And for the record, I’ve never seen a cheap mechanic who actually knew what he was doing. There’s good, and there’s cheap, but the two don’t often come in the same box. o_O
     
    Mennoniteman likes this.
  9. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    I had two 6.0 powerstrokes and, while they were nothing to brag about, I didn't have any major issues with them in 200k miles. The key to the 6.0 was to keep the oil changed on schedule and use good oil, and never run out of fuel. A lot of diesel guys don't realize that running out of fuel is hard on injectors, and especially so with the 6.0 Ford. Now the 7.3 was just about bullet proof, and the new ones are pretty good too, but beware of overrevving the new powerstrokes coming off a mountain, the tranny is notorious for not upshifting on a steep long downhill grade with a load on, and redlining will eventually blow the motor.
     
  10. KSQ2

    KSQ2 Well-Known Member

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    Just curious, how do you keep your speeds down with a load if the engine won’t hold them back? We have a 20,000 lb Motorhome with a 12 valve Cummins and a 6 speed Allison. We don’t have exhaust breaks on it, but the Cummins will keep it under control without having to apply the brakes very much.
     
  11. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    No, holding back isn't the problem, with the exhaust brake it will hold a big load downhill just fine. The problem is that it holds back to much, so if you want to increase speed, or, you get to the bottom of the hill and go to accelerate it doesn't want to shift up into a higher gear, thus over revving if you just hold it flat, or if you have bad hearing like my friends dad had when he blew his motor. Giving it more time to shift up, or shifting out of towhaul/ engine brake mode also takes care of the problem.
     
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  12. KSQ2

    KSQ2 Well-Known Member

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    That shows how little I know about diesel pickups; I had no idea they had exhaust brakes.
     

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