Wishing for a severe fireblight outbreak this year

Discussion in 'Fruit Trees' started by Native Hunter, Apr 15, 2019.

  1. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I have 4 pear varieties and a couple of new apple varieties that look like they will bear fruit for the first time this year. I hope we get a severe fireblight outbreak so I can see if they are worthy to keep living or not.
     
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  2. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Is that like wishing for a bank robbery to see if the sheriffs dept. is functioning?
     
  3. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Yes....or someone wanting to try out a new burglar alarm....;)
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2019
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  4. TreeDaddy

    TreeDaddy Well-Known Member

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    Now,THAT'S funny!!

    bill
     
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  5. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Did you ever hear of using Fertilome Fire Blight Spray to apply over the flowering stage to help control the disease from spreading?
     
  6. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I've heard of it, but I don't do spraying. My methodology is to grow fruit tree varieties that have a high resistance to disease and thrive without intense human intervention.

    The day will come for every man when he will either be unwilling or unable to do life support on fruit trees. I want my trees to survive past that day.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2019
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  7. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Wouldn't chopping off a tree and gluing another one on it be intense human intervention? Just kidding. I agree, since there's no real cure for fire blight, might as well not plant any trees that are susceptible to it.
     
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  8. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I don't know why it struck me so funny, but that thing about gluing trees together made me laugh out loud...:D
     
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  9. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    One more way to look at the intense human intervention thingie - most of us would be willing to have heart bypass surgery to save our lives.....we just wouldn't want to have the surgery 5 or 6 times a year for the next 60 years...…:D
     
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  10. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    Kinda like us managing our land to return to native fields or planting trees in fields that generations of farmers spent many an hour clearing rocks, trees , and stumps trying to make a meager living off the land. Sometimes I feel a bit guilty as I look down on the old guys homeplace while I do just as I mentioned. I agree with your thinking, I had an old farmer tell me to plant an apple where I wanted with no soil or tree maintenace, if it was gonna make it then it be a good tree to have, if not, don't need the hastle. I've lived by that thinking. Somewhat. Good luck with your fireblight, hope its intense if that is what you want.:rolleyes:
     
  11. Jeff H

    Jeff H Well-Known Member

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    Love that line of thinking!
     
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  12. Cap'n

    Cap'n Active Member

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    Sounds like baptism by fire (blight). If you survive your first battle you might make a good soldier.
     
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  13. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Yep, I agree. Another analogy would be that it's like testing a bulletproof vest to make sure it works!
     
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  14. Chainsaw

    Chainsaw Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely, a fire blight test right away would be a good thing. We do the same type thing with our newly grown dayliies whether we have bought them or spawned them from our own lines. They are grown outside with no fertilizer and no mulch. If they don't make the winter which many bought from away do not then we are saved the problems of introducing their genes which do not line up with this environment into our lines. Mulch would protect them from the winters extreme temperatures but crossing them into our line would be going backwards and not forward.
     
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