Where did my Clover go.

Discussion in 'Food Plots for Wildlife' started by wsucoug, Jun 6, 2019.

  1. wsucoug

    wsucoug Member

    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Washington State
    Hardiness Zone:
    5a/5b
    I planted Red Clover, Alice White Clover, Oats, and Chicory around May 10th of 2018. I Also added some triple 16 to get things going. Conventional tillage. Planting rates where heavy at:

    Approx: 55 Lbs of oats
    Approx: 4 pounds of chicory
    Approx. 3 pounds of white clover
    Approx 10 pounds of Red clover
    This is what it looked like one month after planting:
    IMG_20190606_130955_01.jpg

    IMG_20190606_130529_01.jpg


    This is what things looked like on July 15th:
    image000000 (1).jpg
    image000000 (2).jpg
    image000000 (3).jpg

    On Aug 12th. I also over seeded 25 lbs of WR on this day and rolled the oat stocks. There is pretty much no rain in my area from June 20th to the end of Sept.
    IMG_20190606_131005_01.jpg

    This is about oct 20th after a little bit of moisture, no clover sprouting

    IMG_20190606_131014_01.jpg

    November 11th,

    IMG_20190606_131021_01.jpg

    May 5th of this year:

    IMG_20190606_131035_01.jpg

    And this is the past weekend, June 2nd 2019. It's pretty much chicory and the WR that i over seeded. There is a few clover plants here and there, but i would consider them gone. IMG_20190606_131039_01.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2019
  2. wsucoug

    wsucoug Member

    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Washington State
    Hardiness Zone:
    5a/5b
    So, does anyone have a few theories about where the red clover and white clover went? I have a few theories but I would like to see if anything is that obvious.
     
  3. cutman

    cutman Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    1,399
    Likes Received:
    1,082
    Location:
    South Carolina USDA Zone 8/9
    I’d say that if the drought didn’t kill it, the cold winter finished it off.
     
    dogghr likes this.
  4. DIY

    DIY Member

    Messages:
    83
    Likes Received:
    37
    Location:
    SE Tennessee
    Good looking chicory. I'd maybe overseed that plot mid-summer with Frosty Berseem and Blackhawk Arrowleaf and hunt it this fall.
     
  5. Elkaddict

    Elkaddict Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,018
    Likes Received:
    520
    Location:
    Catskills, NY
    Way to much chicory for one thing. I have severe winters and good white clover stands always survive. I have a hunch that too much clover seed can equal crowding/studded root development. That could explain some loss. Just a guess. How big was your plot?
     
  6. wsucoug

    wsucoug Member

    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Washington State
    Hardiness Zone:
    5a/5b
    Plot was just under an acre
     
  7. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,482
    Likes Received:
    2,129
    Location:
    Monroe County, WV
    This fall overseed with RC and WC and rye again. Should bounce back after the drought did it in. Clovers have shallow root structure early on whereas chicory is a taproot making them more drought resistant. Heck of a chicory plot I'll say. Good luck.
     
  8. Elkaddict

    Elkaddict Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,018
    Likes Received:
    520
    Location:
    Catskills, NY
    In my experience, 11/2lb per acre of a chicory is the limit for a good chicory/clover mix. Similarly, too much clover seed IMO. For my white clover/chicory combos, I think 4lbs is about right. I was slow learning that too much seed is not better. Just my 0.02.
     
  9. Chainsaw

    Chainsaw Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,712
    Likes Received:
    1,140
    Location:
    northern New York
    Hardiness Zone:
    literally on the line of 4b/5a
    Chicory does well in the driest of conditions as Dogghr stated whereas clover does not. Also we have had the same experience as Elk with chicory,a pound plus is plenty.
     
  10. sagittarius

    sagittarius Member

    Messages:
    84
    Likes Received:
    53
    Location:
    SE WI Zone 5a
    You kinda answered your own question.
     
  11. wsucoug

    wsucoug Member

    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Washington State
    Hardiness Zone:
    5a/5b
    This is why I posted. Out west it is always dry and hot during those months, that's why we are always on fire. I didn't think those months where that much different than our typical summers, but i guess it could have been.

    I am thinking maybe this time around that with the heavy seeding rates, the clovers just didn't get a chance to establish enough energy in the root systems to get through the summer. Maybe if it was an established root system it wouldn't have been an issue, but I am thinking i just gave them too much competition on this planting.
     
  12. shawn cox

    shawn cox Active Member

    Messages:
    257
    Likes Received:
    133
    Location:
    South Georgia
    I am thinking when you over seeded the 25 lbs of WR and then rolled it you probably crimped the white clover and killed it during that hot dry time.
     
  13. THE LLC

    THE LLC Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,463
    Likes Received:
    866
    Location:
    Georgia
    Tell you the truth, looking at what you got, I wouldn't worry about a thing---except maybe how to duplicate that chicory plot. Screw clover when you got chicory like that.
     
    wsucoug likes this.
  14. wsucoug

    wsucoug Member

    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Washington State
    Hardiness Zone:
    5a/5b
    I am pretty sure this isn't the case. Clover was full dormant at this point and I couldn't see any green vegetation. In fact I was debating spraying gly at this point to kill some tough weeds that were poping up.
     
    shawn cox likes this.
  15. wsucoug

    wsucoug Member

    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Washington State
    Hardiness Zone:
    5a/5b
    Ain't gonna lie....it looks good. I was heavy when I planted them because I was hoping they would pull through our tough conditions. Some weeds are creeping in on the bear spots. Gonna leave it till early July when half will be converted LC brassicas.....or I may just leave it. Who knows.
     
  16. shawn cox

    shawn cox Active Member

    Messages:
    257
    Likes Received:
    133
    Location:
    South Georgia
    What was the soil ph in this plot?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  17. wsucoug

    wsucoug Member

    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Washington State
    Hardiness Zone:
    5a/5b
     
  18. shawn cox

    shawn cox Active Member

    Messages:
    257
    Likes Received:
    133
    Location:
    South Georgia
    Well that shouldn’t have been an issue. That is crazy you lost the clover like that unless the chicory just our competed it since it was a little on the thick side. I usually only add maybe a pound of chicory


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Bottomland
Total: 54 (members: 2, guests: 41, robots: 11)
(moderators are listed in blue)