Well, learned something new about Ozark Chinquapins....

Discussion in 'Native Habitat Management' started by letemgrow, Aug 28, 2016.

  1. TX-Aggie

    TX-Aggie Active Member

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    IMG_4031.JPG

    Our Ozark Chinquapin planting’s were completed during a chilly drizzling soaker turkey season afternoon. Planted, tree protection tubes put in place, and a month later, we have baby trees coming up.


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  2. letemgrow

    letemgrow Active Member

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    Did you get the seeds from the foundation?
     
  3. TX-Aggie

    TX-Aggie Active Member

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    Yes, we did.


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  4. shedder

    shedder Active Member

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  5. Cap'n

    Cap'n Active Member

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    Good looking seedling. So you stratified the nuts, waited for a radicle and then planted them in their forever home?
     
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  6. TX-Aggie

    TX-Aggie Active Member

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    Correct on the process for planting the seeds. The foundation sends instructions with the seeds to keep them in the fridge, wetting the peat moss they are shipped in to keep damp not soaked, about a week or two out from planting, pull them out of the fridge which sparks the radicle growth, and then plant.

    We found they grew better on sloped ground or right at the crest of a holler than the plantings on flat ground. We have the plantings marked on topo maps of our property and my dad checks on them once a month. Unfortunately, the "mini" summer drought got a few of them that were in locations where we couldn't get water to them, which was the same outcome in those areas with our oak plantings from the MDC.
     
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  7. Cap'n

    Cap'n Active Member

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    I joined the foundation and hope to get some nuts from them this fall. I haven't heard anything from them though. I normally like to get my seedling through the summer then plant in the fall & winter. The "mini drought got several of mine too.
    Did you get any nuts from them this year?
     
  8. TX-Aggie

    TX-Aggie Active Member

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    They shipped around February this year, and I would assume the same this coming year.


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  9. Rogers38

    Rogers38 Member

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  10. shedder

    shedder Active Member

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  11. shedder

    shedder Active Member

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    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYLWMTTEAeTvZFQzqlT886g/videos



    The videos had info like

    Chestnut seed can be frozen in liquid Nitrogen, thawed, and grown. Big news for seed storage.

    By pollinating by hand, seed count could be 6-7 per burr instead of one, the norm.

    Will make seed in 3 years.

    Grows in poor soil. Didn't even like humus.

    Claimed it grows in higher ph soil, if well drained.

    Handles -20 C.

    Leaves longer and bigger north of Arkansas river.

    Handles severe drought.

    Has a better nutrition profile.

    Tubes help blow scent away from predators.

    Blight (minor) and gall wasp resistance to some degree.

    Can be grafted to CC.

    Has high gene diversity.

    "The Ozark chinquapin is a tree native to the mountain regions of Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma with populations occuring in East Texas, Northern Louisiana, Virginia, Alabama, and Mississippi. "

    Forgetting more

    From the sounds of it, it has a big future.

    https://ozarkchinquapinmembership.org

    The web site has been getting updates this month. I don't know where they are getting their money but the web site is very slick. Way better than most I look at.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2019
  12. shedder

    shedder Active Member

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    FYI This is likely to be added as a video soon. They have been adding them this month. One today in fact.

    '2:20PM MDC State Nursery and Chinquapins as Wildlife Food Plots – Mike Fiaoni, Missouri Department of Conservation State Nursery Supervisor shares results from experiments growing Ozark Chinquapin. Preston Chapman, MDC Forester describes work on a new concept: Ozark Chinquapin tree food plots."

    Meeting Agenda

    9:00AM WELCOME! – Introductions from Chris Wyatt Arkansas Department of Forestry and Steve Bost, President/Founder of Ozark Chinquapin Foundation. Why we are here.

    9:10AM Remembering When – Inspiring first-hand accounts of the tree from Harold Adams and Al Knox of how important the tree once was.

    9:20AM Saving an American Treasure, The Ozark Chinquapin – Steve Bost, President/Founder of the Ozark Chinquapin Foundation. The history of the tree, its historic range, its loss from our forest and the incredible restoration work today to reintroduce this tree!

    10:05AM Creation of Research Plot at Hobbs State Park Arkansas – Al Knox of Hobbs State Park describes the “Tree Roots” effort of himself, Steve Chyrchel, Park staff and Volunteers to save and restore this tree in Northwest Arkansas.

    10:25AM Leaf Analysis for Blight Resistance, Pollination Surprises & Website Responses – Leslie Bost, OCF Breeding and Field Researcher- shares cutting edge field and laboratory techniques to identify blight resistance by leaf assay. He also shares little know blooming secrets of the trees as well as updates on members joining and nut collection.

    10:45AM How Trees Talk – Leslie Bost, creator of our new website and online joining, shares how the public has responded to new site.

    10:50AM Musical Break by Donna and Kelly Mulhollan

    10:55AM BREAK

    11:05AM Saving the American Chestnut In Georgia-Mark Stoakes, former President of Georgia Chapter and a National Board Member of the American Chestnut Foundation and Lifetime member of Ozark Chinquapin Foundation, describes the work to restore the American chestnut in his home state, what they have learned and Ozark chinquapin plantings in Georgia.

    11:50AM Award Presentation for Rebecca Tindall – People Making a Difference.

    11:55AM Group Photo

    12:00 LUNCH

    1:00PM Using Biotechnology to Restore the Ozark Chinquapin – Hannah Carter Pilkey-Second year Masters Student working with Professor Powell’s lab at SUNY-ESF State University of New York College of Environmental Science & Forestry (SUNY-ESF) at Syracuse New York. Hannah describes cutting edge technology work to produce a blight resistant American chestnut and her work to produce a blight-resistant Ozark chinquapin.

    1:30PM Tree Ring Analysis of Old Growth Ozark Chinquapin- Fred Paillet –Retired Professor of Geosciences University of Arkansas, shares his findings reconstructing old growth Ozark Chinquapin before and after the blight.

    2:10PM Musical Break – Donna and Kelly Mulhollan -Singing for the trees.

    2:20PM MDC State Nursery and Chinquapins as Wildlife Food Plots – Mike Fiaoni, Missouri Department of Conservation State Nursery Supervisor shares results from experiments growing Ozark Chinquapin. Preston Chapman, MDC Forester describes work on a new concept: Ozark Chinquapin tree food plots.

    2:50PM The Return of the “Chinkypin” to the Buffalo River-Ross Noland. Executive Director of the Buffalo River Foundation Buffalo River Foundation describes a partnership with OCF to restore the tree back to its native range on Buffalo River Foundation land near the Buffalo River.

    3:15PM Research Test Plot OXO A.J Hendershott, Regional Supervisor, Missouri Department of Conservation, describes the location and plan for planting and monitoring the new experimental Ozark Chinquapins with genetics for resistance. A.J. also shares Facebook updates!

    3:45PM Applying What We Know- Steve Bost and Jerry Plunkett – What will we do tomorrow that is significant, discussion and feedback, open forum.

    4:00PM Wrap up
     
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  13. Cap'n

    Cap'n Active Member

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    I got my chinquapin nuts today. I didn't count them but I think they said they were sending 5. I had to head out so i just put them in the fridge. I did see radicals though.
     
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  14. shedder

    shedder Active Member

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  15. TX-Aggie

    TX-Aggie Active Member

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    My dad and I received ours as well.
     
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  16. Neahawg

    Neahawg Active Member

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    Got ours in Hopi g to find time to plant them soon.
     
  17. shedder

    shedder Active Member

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    This guys are talking tons of seed within 10 years. If that is the case anyone should be able to get some.
     
  18. shedder

    shedder Active Member

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    One tree does not make a forest but it is a hopeful sign.

    "We are having success so far and without saying too much I will say that at least one of the pure Ozark chinquapin crosses on our test plot is more blight resistant than wild type Ozark chinquapin and much more resistant than American chestnut. This particular tree has close resistance level to pure Chinese chestnuts. This cross was the result of a manual pollination."

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/272120753285618/permalink/605448306619526/

    Also

    "Sandra Anagnostakis Yes!!! Ozark chinquapins!!! My favorite. They do amazingly well in Hamden, CT, and have NO GALL WASP! I love these trees. The Allegheny chinquapins are nice, but are not TREES. Next year, I'm coming to the meeting. Let me know WAY ahead of time when it is."
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    This comment by Sandra surprised me. She was a chestnut researcher and knows her stuff. I need to get some seed when it becomes more available. Their supply is still limited but they plan to have a surplus soon.
     
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  19. Chipdasqrrl

    Chipdasqrrl Active Member

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    A lot of people saying they got their chestnuts but no updates, has anyone had much success with them yet?


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  20. TX-Aggie

    TX-Aggie Active Member

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    My dad and I received our Ozark Chinquapin nuts earlier this year. We were able to get roughly 3-6" taproots grown before planting. Last year some of the group that got them for our farm did not follow the instructions for care until planting, and the taproots barely grew an inch. Even with that, we had trees started for approx 45% of the nuts planted. With our longer taproots starting, we are hoping for better success. I won't be able to make it back up to my property until 4th of July time period. I will definitely post pictures of the 2019 planting, along with updates for our 2018 plantings around that time.
     
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