Warm Season Grass?

Discussion in 'Name This Plant' started by DougG, Sep 16, 2019.

  1. DougG

    DougG Member

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    Location:
    Southern Ohio
    is this some kind of warm season grass? Not really familiar with them, and this is the only one on a fallow field on our property.
     

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  2. j-bird

    j-bird Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Decatur county, IN Zone 6a
    Please have someone confirm but I think what you have may be johnson grass - a noxious weed. The seed head looks like it and in the other picture when you zoom in I see a white "vein" on the leaves and that tends to give johnson grass away. Pull one of the plants and take it to your local USDA service office (every county should have one). They should be able to confirm. IF it is johnson grass it will take over if allowed to spread it really like the heat of summer. JG get tall (5 to 6 feet seed heads) grows in dense clusters and can spread by seed as well as rhizones....so don't disc it. Cleth or gly will kill it. but again.....confirm that is what it is first.
     
  3. Jack Terpack

    Jack Terpack Active Member

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    Location:
    Hodges, South Carolina
    That sure looks like Johnson Grass. I've been fighting it for 20 years. I have in fairly well under control but every year I have a few pop up. I hit the with Gly and mow the areas frequently to keep setting any new growth down. I had about two acres and now I only find a few each spring. Has no value at all and will spread like wildfire.
     
  4. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Kentucky (Zone 6B)
    I'm looking on an I-phone screen but agree with others that this looks like JG. There are lots of good ID links that you can Google since it is such an invasive species.

    Tip: After you kill the plant, mark that area of the field some way and check it each year about this time for more that have sprouted. This isn't likely the first year that plant has been there and could have dropped seed in the past. Like many other plants, the seed don't all germinate the same year, so you could get new plants emerging for quite some time.

    Best wishes.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2019
  5. DougG

    DougG Member

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    Location:
    Southern Ohio
    thanks all for the input
     

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