Tree with berries

Discussion in 'Name This Plant' started by F12Mahon, Sep 3, 2019.

  1. F12Mahon

    F12Mahon Member

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    Location:
    Ogle Co, IL
    Hardiness Zone:
    5
    I have a tree with whiteish berries I cant find on the web. Somebody know what it is? Doesn't look like any chokecherry I've seen.

    Eugene[​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

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  2. DrDirtNap

    DrDirtNap Active Member

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    Location:
    North Mississippi
    Hardiness Zone:
    7
    Looks like Grey Dogwood to me


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  3. g squared 23

    g squared 23 Active Member

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    Location:
    Central Illinois
    Grey, red osier or rough leafed dogwood. I struggle to tell the difference for certain, something about piths and flower shapes? I have planted all 3, and I still can’t tell the difference unless I can rub a leaf.

    Either way, it’s a good one in my area. I try to encourage it with its natural tendency to form thickets. I have one corner of my in-law’s property that has a 10’ high dogwood thicket and it ALWAYS has a deer or three bedded in it. Browse preference seems average, they aren’t drawn out into the open over it, but all shrubs I see back in the woods have been browsed.


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    Native Hunter likes this.
  4. sagittarius

    sagittarius Active Member

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    Location:
    SE WI Zone 5a
    Me too.
     
  5. MarkDarvin

    MarkDarvin Well-Known Member

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    Dogwood dawg. What kind matters not. Great to have.
     
  6. j-bird

    j-bird Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Decatur county, IN Zone 6a
    It most certainly is a dogwood of some kind. it's not flowering dogwood as they produce red berries. I doubt it's ROD - as ROD has a distinctive red coloration and tends to be a low multi-stemmed shrub vs a tree form. Grey/gray dogwood has the white berries, but mine tend to be more of a thicket formation(cluster of independent plants)....not a tree.....not a single plant with multiple stems. I am not as familiar with rough-leaf dogwood. If I was a betting man....I'm guessing either Gray or Rough-leaf dogwood. You likely have others as the birds tend to spread the seed fairly easily. Nice tree/shrub to have either way. I do not see a lot of browse on my grey dogwoods....but I like having the native shrubs around (which my property lacks). Good deer level cover and wildlife friendly in other ways (bee's and birds).
     
  7. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    ^^^^^^This. Agree it is one of the three.

    I think you can rule out Rough Leaf because I don't see any distinctive hairs on the young shoots, which are typical of that variety of dogwood.

    You can probably rule out Red Osier if you can't see the distinctive red, mature shoots. However, some of the wild ones are not as distinctive as the cultivated ones, so that can leave a little doubt.

    That leaves Grey, which is the most likely.

    As Mark said, it doesn't matter. All have similar wildlife value.
     
    TreeDaddy likes this.
  8. DRandall90

    DRandall90 Active Member

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    Location:
    Minnesota
    Hardiness Zone:
    3
    I'm impressed you were able to take pictures of dogwoods with fruit still on them. Birds and other wildlife usually get to those before anyone has a chance to see them around here.
     
  9. F12Mahon

    F12Mahon Member

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    Location:
    Ogle Co, IL
    Hardiness Zone:
    5
    Found another of these trees. Took a picture of the bark of a small branch. I cut it and other trees down to release a native plum. [​IMG]

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  10. F12Mahon

    F12Mahon Member

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    Location:
    Ogle Co, IL
    Hardiness Zone:
    5
    From your keyboard to my farms fauna!

    Eugene[​IMG][​IMG]
     
  11. DRandall90

    DRandall90 Active Member

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    Location:
    Minnesota
    Hardiness Zone:
    3
    Nature never ceases to amaze.

    Side note -- If that's a pretty mature dogwood, they can be growth from cuttings remarkably well. People like them as ornamentals in yards and trim them regularly. Makes it easy to find cuttings to grow more. Deer will browse their twigs and leaves and they are great cover.

    We plant combinations of dogwood, plums, elderberry and honeysuckle on our field edges to build thick cover and browse areas. Especially when plots are young or in rotation, it takes some pressure off the plots.
     

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