Tree help

Discussion in 'Name This Plant' started by Prelude8626, Feb 11, 2019.

  1. Prelude8626

    Prelude8626 Member

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    All. Need help identifying this clump of saplings. I need to take them out the open up a small food plot. I do know there are some white oaks in the mix and they will stay (they also need some space). I believe they are American beech but am not sure.
     
  2. Prelude8626

    Prelude8626 Member

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  3. Tap

    Tap Well-Known Member

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    Need better pics.
    Are there any more mature trees there? If so, are they still holding leaves? Beech is probably the last tree to drop leaves. Late March or April and some still hold leaves. Which is one reason I like having some beech around. They make great stand cover, even if you aren't actually in a beech, just having one growing beside your stand tree is a good thing.


    Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk
     
  4. Prelude8626

    Prelude8626 Member

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    [​IMG] I don’t have any pictures of the tops, but didn’t see many leaves if any. I need to clear space for a plot but want to know what I’m cutting before hand.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    About 80% sure that is American Hornbeam (aka Musclewood). I think I can see ridges in the bark of some of those saplings which is a characteristic of this species. Coloration is right too.
     
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  6. Prelude8626

    Prelude8626 Member

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    That looks like it! It does have ridges in it, especially towards the bottom.
     
  7. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    That is some of the hardest wood you will ever cut. In my area of the country the old timers have a different name for this tree. They call it "Iron Beech" because it is hard as iron and the bark resembles beech. However, that tree will won't grow nearly as large as a beech.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019
  8. Prelude8626

    Prelude8626 Member

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    Any good uses for it? It’s currently choking out some white oaks next to my food plot and would like to clear them out. What’s the best way to remove them?
     
  9. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I would just saw them off flush with the ground and wet the stump with straight Gly. That takes care of most trees, although I have never tried it on a hornbeam. It will take a while for the stumps and roots to rot away, but they eventually will.

    If you need a good hard club, they would be great for that....:)
     
  10. pinetag

    pinetag Well-Known Member

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    I agree with Native. I have always heard it called "ironwood" but now I know the appropriate name for it. I have cut down quite a few recently making my access trails and they are hard as a rock! For the larger diameter trunks it would take some good revving and a few good pops with the brush cutter blade before getting all the way through.
     
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  11. Hob 'n Grind

    Hob 'n Grind Member

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    I have this same type of tree on my property and the Pl@ntNet App said European Hornbeam. American Hornbeam makes more sense now though.
     
  12. farmhunter

    farmhunter Well-Known Member

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    great walking sticks - polishes up well.
     

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