Tree excitement.

Discussion in 'Fruit Trees' started by F12Mahon, Aug 27, 2019.

  1. F12Mahon

    F12Mahon Member

    Messages:
    93
    Likes Received:
    33
    Location:
    Ogle Co, IL
    Hardiness Zone:
    5
    Thought I found a crab apple tree. Went back today for a closer look. It's a plum. I think a native plum. Can anyone confirm it?

    Wasn't much flesh on the stone. Took a bite and talk about astringent! It needs released. Gotta work on that when my saw has a new fuel line installed.[​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
     
    Chainsaw and Merle Hawggard like this.
  2. 144

    144 Active Member

    Messages:
    176
    Likes Received:
    55
    Location:
    North LA
    Yep, looks like a native plum to me


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  3. F12Mahon

    F12Mahon Member

    Messages:
    93
    Likes Received:
    33
    Location:
    Ogle Co, IL
    Hardiness Zone:
    5
    That closeup one in the second pikture is the one I tasted. Should it be deeper red? I'venever been around native plums before.

    Eugene
     
  4. 144

    144 Active Member

    Messages:
    176
    Likes Received:
    55
    Location:
    North LA
    Color/Ripening really depends on the type of native plum and the tree itself. It’s kind of hard to tell from that picture if that tree is a single trunk or multi stemmed. Probably American Plum or possibly a Mexican Plum based off of the location. I’d take a picture of the bark and post it as well. I’m not familiar with American plum as that variety is not native down here, but I’m sure others will pipe up with more info on ripening etc. on those.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  5. F12Mahon

    F12Mahon Member

    Messages:
    93
    Likes Received:
    33
    Location:
    Ogle Co, IL
    Hardiness Zone:
    5
    First 2 pictures are closer views of the plum tree. The last is a huge tree that scares me. It towers over everything and is right behind the plum. I think it is a cottonwood and the base is 18 to 24 inches in diameter. I'm thinking of cutting a thick hinge in it and letting the wind take it down. If my name was Kvothe I could command the wind. :)[​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
     
  6. Gravel Road

    Gravel Road Active Member

    Messages:
    217
    Likes Received:
    153
    Location:
    Northeast Kansas
    Hardiness Zone:
    6A
    Call me a chicken, but I'd be paranoid about cutting into that tree with all the dead wood overhead!
     
    g squared 23 likes this.
  7. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    965
    Likes Received:
    475
    Location:
    Hawaii/North Carolina
    Hardiness Zone:
    6b
    If the large tree doesn't have leaves then what do you gain by cutting it down? It's not robbing any sun and appears to be dead so probably not robbing water either.
     
  8. F12Mahon

    F12Mahon Member

    Messages:
    93
    Likes Received:
    33
    Location:
    Ogle Co, IL
    Hardiness Zone:
    5
    I want to eliminate the possibility of it falling on the native plum.
     
  9. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    965
    Likes Received:
    475
    Location:
    Hawaii/North Carolina
    Hardiness Zone:
    6b
    Oh gotcha. Could be risky either way, that's a big dead tree!
     
  10. TreeDaddy

    TreeDaddy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    577
    Likes Received:
    307
    Location:
    walton,texas
    Widow maker......disaster written all over it......let it be

    bill
     
  11. j-bird

    j-bird Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,466
    Likes Received:
    1,620
    Location:
    Decatur county, IN Zone 6a
    I agree with the others. Sometimes we need to know when to leave well enough alone. That large dead tree will come down on it's own...hopefully slowly. I hate cutting large trees, I hate cutting dead trees....cutting large dead trees....I simply refuse to do. Also keep in mind dead trees have other habitat benefits as well...dens, wood sources for woodpeckers and perches for hawks. ONLY way I deal with that tree is if I have a professional out for other reasons and THEY can take the risk of bringing it down.

    I think what you have is a plum as well and releasing it is a good call. The taste and lack of flesh may be because of it struggling to get what it needs. If you release it I suspect you will see more in other areas over time as the critters disperse the seed for you as well as better fruit.
     
  12. F12Mahon

    F12Mahon Member

    Messages:
    93
    Likes Received:
    33
    Location:
    Ogle Co, IL
    Hardiness Zone:
    5
    Cut down the big cottonwood Saturday. Stunk like a sewer. Didn't get the notch clean so it tilted and stopped. Cut a little more in the back cut and it fell the rest of the way. Made a heck of a racket and snapped off a 6 inch choke cherry about 8 feet off the ground. Hope a friend wants the wood. Plum tree is unscathed. Had an aw-crap moment. Had a trail cam pointed at the plum. It was screwed into a broken but not detached branch of the cottonwood. Yup, forgot to remove it. Bent the eye screw but other than that it is fine. [​IMG][​IMG]
     
    cutman likes this.

Share This Page

(moderators are listed in blue)