Tractor purchase and storage options

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by weekender21, Jul 28, 2020.

  1. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

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    I finally made it back to the mainland after 8 years of living in Hawaii. Now I'm within 6 hours of our property and looking to take advantage of the shorter commute. We're on the market for a tractor and looking for advice on storage options.

    Tractor
    Main uses:
    • Logging road and food plot mowing/maintenance
    • spraying plots
    • hauling seed, lime, etc. up the hill
    We have a Kubota dealer nearby so that's the way I'll likely go. I'm looking at their L series machines and will likely go with a 2501 DT but also considering the 33 or 39 HP models. I could see purchasing a larger machine at a later date but like the smaller machine for ease of towing, storage, and price.

    Storage

    Leaning towards a shipping container. I like that they are sealed more than most options which should prevent or reduce damage caused by rodents. It's relatively cool in our part of the mountains so I'm not too concerned with how hot they can get in warmer areas. Also considering a metal building but the added cost of pouring a slab and building construction is definitely a con.

    Thoughts or recommendations on the tractor purchase and storage are much appreciated!
     
  2. buckdeer1

    buckdeer1 Well-Known Member

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    I cut vents in mine in Kansas to help the heat but I don't have any problems with rodents.I would get one that opens on both ends if parking a tractor
     
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  3. Elkaddict

    Elkaddict Well-Known Member

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    Kubota tractors have earned a reputation for reliability. One thing to keep in mind is they tend to be lighter then comparable tractors. For heavy work, mass really matters. I’d go at least the 39hp route. Also, keep in mind hydrostatic drives give up a significant amount of hp. For general use, I personally prefer gears. You won’t hear very many people complain about too much hp. I’ve found our MF1754 has adequate power for 90% of what we do....but it could do more if it were heavier. I was advised to get a cabbed model and was penny wise/pound foolish. (I’ve since picked up cabbed Landini 64 and a MF4707). I can’t tell you how nice it is to be working in the in a cab with AC and out of reach of the yellow jackets when it’s hot, or when it’s 20 below and the wind is howling to have the heat cranked. As far as storage, we opted to wait a few years until we could build a pole barn. My concern with the container was having to work on it in the container. Just my 0.02.
     
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  4. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    What Elkaddict said. My tractor is too big to fit in a container but I used to keep my golf cart in one. Absolutely rodent proof, but hot in Texas summers. You probably won’t have that problem. A vent was already installed in mine when I bought it.
     
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  5. TheOldOak

    TheOldOak Active Member

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    Go with at least 33 HP, more if budget allows. FEL is a must. Kubota hard to beat.
     
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  6. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    I third the go bigger idea for a tractor. As far as storage, I kept a Yamaha 450 ATV in a metal storage container out in the woods for a while, and it seemed like it was too damp. Otherwise, it always ran smooth, I never had trouble with that 4 wheeler, but every time I kept it in the metal container it developed gas and carb trouble. I'd go with a small pole barn.
     
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  7. BoneCrusher20

    BoneCrusher20 Active Member

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    any farmers nearby? Worth a visit to get to know neighbors and make introduction, might be able to work deal and rent spot in the barn. Then you know its being at least not sitting stale.

    After that i'm figuring out what type of beer the farmer likes and dropping one off every now and then.

    Also go with bigger tractor!!
     
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  8. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

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    I have thought of renting space. One of my neighbors has a metal building, I need to ask.
     
  9. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

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    Any opinions on used vs. new tractors? Looks like they deprecate enough to make shopping used a good option. How many hours is too many?


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  10. OkieKubota

    OkieKubota Moderator Staff Member

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    On the tractor get the 39HP Grand L model. The Grand L has a lot more features than the standard L such as quick release bucket, full size floor board, a larger/heavier frame, etc...get a GST (gear select transmission). You can shift and go between forward and reverse without using the clutch like you would have to with the DT model and you won’t be giving up a lot of HP like you do with the HST...
     
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  11. TheOldOak

    TheOldOak Active Member

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    I bought a used 2014 L3200 with 360 hours, haven't had to do a thing to it yet. Probably saved 50% off new price, they are not cheap. I did change all fluids and filters. I would have no qualms about buying used with under 500 hours, assuming it runs good and hasn't been abused. If you take care of it, should last for thousands of hours.
     
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  12. Elkaddict

    Elkaddict Well-Known Member

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    Good used tractors around here go for so much it’s ridiculous. I will say that there are huge benefits to a pre emission’s rule engines. They are far simpler, and tend to have more low end grunt.
     
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  13. Bowhunter

    Bowhunter Well-Known Member

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    The 2501 DT is a very capable tractor and should work well for the work that your proposing. Two good aspects to that tractor are its low price point, and no emissions because of being under the 26 horsepower threshold. I know of a few guys that have that tractor and work them well above what they are supposed to and have had zero issues other than a seat safety switch issue which easily fixed. Also, like @Elkaddict mentioned, the resale value of compact tractors currently are through the roof so if down the road you want to upgrade to a larger tractor then you won't get hurt too bad. This was one factor to me buying new instead of used because I literally only spent a few thousand more dollars and got exactly what I wanted.

    I must be the odd man out on the GST vs. HST discussion.....I MUCH prefer HST for two main reasons. Ease of operation for mowing and loader work, and having operating both I've never once felt that I wanted more power than the HST offers. If I've ever had something that the tractor wouldn't do in low range, then chances are I shouldn't be doing it anyway. If you have small fields and tighter areas your left leg will thank you for getting a tractor with the "slushbox" transmission. YMMV.
     
  14. Buckly

    Buckly Well-Known Member

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    Everybody wants a good used tractor so the price on them is usually too high. Unless you get the right deal. On a tractor 500-1000 hours shouldn’t be a problem. I’ve done both and never had any problems as long as you keep maintenance up. 40 HP should do the things you want to do but, will have limitations and you just work with what you got. As far as storage, I like air flow around the equipment. I don’t prefer sealed in. A simple few poles in the ground with a roof would work well for a tractor. Wouldn’t cost much at all. Just keep the sun and the rain off it. You could even put a barrier wall on one side for weather protection.
     
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  15. Hoosierhunting

    Hoosierhunting Well-Known Member

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    Second the pre-emissions tractor comment. If it were me, I’d buy a pre-emissions used 40-50hp tractor. If it’s been maintained well I wouldn’t sweat hours too much. Then use the savings to build a small pole barn. You can always pour the slab for the barn down the road if you feel you need a concrete floor in it.


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  16. Hoosierhunting

    Hoosierhunting Well-Known Member

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    I bought a pre-emissions 2005 JD 5105 with MFWD for $11K, it had 850 hours on it and was built in the US at the Georgia plant. It’s been a great tractor and is as simple as they get. I did have a hard time finding the FEL for it though and shelled out $3500 for one.


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  17. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

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    Guess I should add the tractor will be stored 370 miles away. That’s consideration for the shipping container. I’d go a different route if it was in my backyard. However, security and rodent protection are high priorities. I have a few areas in mind that are shaded. Our extreme summer temperatures in the mountains are rarely more than 80F with 85F being about max. It is wet up there though.


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  18. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    That's a good deal on a very good tractor.
     
  19. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Just warning you, mice will eat a tractor right up if you don't have a concrete floor to make it mice proof. Mice love tractors, under the hood is their favorite nesting place, especially inside the air cleaner. They like the taste of hydraulic hose rubber and they floss their teeth on electrical wiring, and use seat cushion foam and air cleaner paper for nest building materials.
     
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  20. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

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    That’s why shipping container is my primary course of action.


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