Tractor differences

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by buckhunter10, May 4, 2021.

  1. buckhunter10

    buckhunter10 Well-Known Member

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    Hey All! I am back, and it feels great!! I have really stepped away from the Facebook deer groups, as they are just a pissing contest, and have gone back to my roots as a forum member. Great to see so many folks still here and doing well.

    I am still running our 39hp Kubota. The terrain we have here in Eastern Ohio is steep and hilly. I love the tractor but I am without a doubt looking to upgrade to 60-70hp in the future.

    I am curious about everyone's thoughts, specifically on front tires. I was talking to a friend who loves JD because he says the front ends are better for hills, due to weight distribution, larger tires, etc. However, Kubota has R4 tires that can be put on their larger tractors.

    Anyhow - any thoughts on the above? Thank you all!
     
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  2. KSQ2

    KSQ2 Well-Known Member

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    We have an 89 Case front wheel assist in that 60-70 hp range. It does very well on slopes, BUT we have a frontend loader on it that puts a lot of weight upfront. I'd recommend a loader for sure, no matter what tractor you choose, that weight will help tremendously, not to mention the convenience of a loader in the first place.
     
  3. buckhunter10

    buckhunter10 Well-Known Member

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    Thank you - I should mention. I currently have 4wd and a loader. It has worked for 8+ years - tires have weight in them and they are spun out.

    It isn't broke, perse but if I am going to upgrade to a larger tractor, I just want to consider if there is any noticeable difference between the tires on a JD and Kubota, specific to this application?

    Also, we are in the foothills of Appalachia so when I say hills, they are pretty darn steep - just to add some context.
     
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  4. OkieKubota

    OkieKubota Moderator Staff Member

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    Civility is dead on FB...I moderate a deer hunting page over there and it is horrible. I am very partial to Kubota tractors so no matter what that is what I would buy...going on 8 years of commercial service with mine with no issues is a testament.
     
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  5. buckhunter10

    buckhunter10 Well-Known Member

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    FB is a sinkhole..... I never met so many experts in my life!

    I do seem to love my Kubota. I also have a small Kubota at home, 24hp Diesel, a Kubota lawn tractor, and a Kubota UTV. The local dealer is 15mins away from my place and he is just a super nice guy, that will just about service anything for me, anytime.

    It would be VERY hard for me to go away from Kubota, but it's a big purchase so I do want to do research for another year or so before I make the final choice.
     
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  6. Elkaddict

    Elkaddict Well-Known Member

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    When we got a larger tractor last year, I looked at the Kubotas. Our place is also plenty hilly. My preference towards a heavier machine lead us in another direction. I ended up with a MF 4707. As. Recall, the weight difference was 3000lbs over the comparable M-4. So far, I’m very happy with it. With the aggressive taller tires in 4WD, I get around effortlessly in 30”+ of snow. FWIW, I think dealer support matters more than color/brand. In the case of dealer local, its 20 min to the MF dealer or 60 to the Kubota or Deere shops.
     
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  7. buckhunter10

    buckhunter10 Well-Known Member

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    Great information!!! Yes, the Kubota is 15mins from me and the sales rep./owner is a friend of mine. If we, need anything, he will have a guy out the day we say we need them. Be really hard to switch and seems I can't find a major reason why, but just trying to do some research first, I suppose.
     
  8. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Just to throw a third color into the mix, when I went tractor shopping I got more tractor for a lot less money by going with blue, as pictured below. After 3 years I am very happy with my T4.75 New Holland. These are the R-1 tires pictured.
    As far as tires are concerned, you can get similar tires on similar HP tractors no matter what the brand, the 75 HP JD will not have any advantage on hills over this machine. Due to the bigger tread and taller tire, R1 tires are a better choice if you are doing a lot of field work. Due to the wider width, closer tread lugs, smaller diameter, and weight rating R4 tires are better if you are doing a lot of loader work on hard surfaces like concrete or blacktop.
    CLEARING ORCHARD ROOT GRAPPLE 2-27-19.jpg
     
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  9. buckhunter10

    buckhunter10 Well-Known Member

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    Have you seen the hybrid tires? They are a blend between the R1 and R4s? I think they are called R14s? Thoughts?
     
  10. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    The R14's are an improved R4 that retain most of the characteristics of the R4. They excel at loading manure in the barnyard, but they aren't going to be very good at pulling a 4000 lb no-till drill uphill in a field on wet grass. For field work you will never see a farmer using R4 or R14 tires, and you usually don't see a landscaper using R1 tires. If planting and tillage field work is your main use the R1 tires are the safer choice to ensure that you will be happy with your new purchase. For mowing either one works ok.
    When doing field work transferring your power to the ground is the important thing, and R4-R14 tire lugs pack full and spin a lot sooner, like a skidloader tire will, than the deeper, more open R1 lugs. R4's spin on top, R1's dig a hole. There's advantages and disadvantages to both, it just depends what the work is that's to be done.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2021
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  11. buckhunter10

    buckhunter10 Well-Known Member

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    That just about mimics what my Kubota salesman said.....wait for a second, is your name, Chris? Are you selling me a tractor, haha JK! Thank you for the information, sir!
     
  12. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    On hilly terrain only get the R1 tires and have them fluid filled. Bucket and bushhog gives plenty of weight if one needs. Personally mine would climb a tree much less worry of climbing my hills. I've had 2 JDs in the last 12 years only to upgrade to a cab which I highly recommend. But I bought both because they gave me the best deal. Play them against each other as they hate each other brand and will try to beat the price. BTW, like cars, inventory sux at moment and getting a deal in the next 2 years is going be tricky. I got full price of what I paid on first tractor on trade in. Couldn't turn it down. Harleys , Jeeps and JDs make for great trades. Just sayin.
     
  13. buckhunter10

    buckhunter10 Well-Known Member

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    I have a buddy who has a small farm that’s begging me to buy my current tractor. I might just have to sell it right after fall planting and wait for a deal!!
     
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  14. buckhunter10

    buckhunter10 Well-Known Member

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    Ps. I figured a WV boy would be chasing the Deere!!
     
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  15. OkieKubota

    OkieKubota Moderator Staff Member

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    Buy the one without plastic hood and fenders...
     
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  16. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    Lol that could be true. But to be honest went with the best deal. The major ones are so equal. Slight advantage is dealer nearby. And they handle my Stilh saws and parts.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  17. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Just politely pointing out, you don't plow with your hood and fenders. (guess you figured out by that smart remark that my tractor has plastic hood and fenders. And my john deere before that did too.)
     
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  18. OkieKubota

    OkieKubota Moderator Staff Member

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    No, I actually was basing what I said off my own experiences. You see, I am not a farmer by trade but I am self employed on my equipment. I don’t have the luxury of plowing and mowing just wide open fields and to tell you the truth most all of my work is in the woods...when I was looking for a tractor I was looking at used I noticed all of the newer JD tractors had either missing fenders or broken fenders and one had no hood because it was broken. I really had no desire to buy a tractor that couldn’t take abuse on its exterior to some extent. This is also the reason I am not interested in a cab tractor because a cab in my line of work greatly limits where you can go or what you can do...same for my dozer...I had no idea your blue tractor was the same because we don’t see many of them around here but I guess now I do...

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2021
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  19. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    What you say is kinda true Okie. But being the car guru you are , you know people tend to be terrible about taking care of their stuff. So the analogy w plastics may or may not hold. When buying I too considered that plastic/ metal decision. But like you my tractor is in the crap much like yours yet 8 years later still looks new.
    I still suggest cabs as they make life much more pleasant. I feel like a puss but no bees, pollen , dust, branches to face, rain , snow,, heat, cold. And working alone most times if I’m bored I can jam to anything from country to rock to gospel.
    What I don’t like about the cab is loss of hearing immediately of any equipment screwing up. But so far no regrets.
    Tractors and cars and women. We have our preferences. Mine happens to be a redheaded woman ,a green tractor, black Harley and whatever hemi Jeep.
    When they all become electric in the future then we have drama.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2021
  20. Bowhunter

    Bowhunter Well-Known Member

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    My only advice would be to not overlook the slightly lesser horsepower tractors, and to look at every brand regardless of the color.

    You can save a bunch of money and have an equally capable tractor for a bunch of coin less.

    What are you doing where you need a tractor that large?

    R1 tires would be a must have if your typically only doing ground engaging work with it.
     
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