Throw N Mow thread...

Discussion in 'Food Plots for Wildlife' started by OkieKubota, Aug 24, 2016.

  1. pinetag

    pinetag Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Virginia
    Hardiness Zone:
    7a
    Something like this (up is North)...
     

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  2. catscratch

    catscratch Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Kansas It's better to wear out than to rust out.
    I almost added that to my original post (to clear the plots north/south for better light). But then I wondered about predominant wind direction, and then access trails, and then bedding, and, and, and.... So I didn't mention it. But, north/south does provide nice light.
     
  3. pinetag

    pinetag Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Virginia
    Hardiness Zone:
    7a
    Predominant wind is coming out of the West. I have access along the eastern, western, and northern property edges. So I could accommodate for any wind direction except something directly out of the N. That would be the most difficult to get in undetected but a wind out of the NW or NE would allow me to move up and down the property lines on either side and get down along the southern border, where it would be ideal for scent to blow out over the river. Getting back on track...it sounds like i should be able to get a couple of decent plots in there using the north-south setup. Thanks!
     
  4. MarkDarvin

    MarkDarvin Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Fordville, ND
    Hardiness Zone:
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    Don't forget the greenhouse effect for uneven terrain. Rollers work great on smooth ground. I don't have a smooth plot, so I need to put a layer of glad wrap (thatch) over the top of mine to ensure they get the humidity they need to pop and get in the soil.
     
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  5. MarkDarvin

    MarkDarvin Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Fordville, ND
    Hardiness Zone:
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    I learned that lesson when raking hay on the farm. At times, there would be moist dirt under the row, and dry dirt in between. Dry is dry, but if you're on the bubble, that straw is a lifesaver.
     
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  6. catscratch

    catscratch Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Kansas It's better to wear out than to rust out.
    A couple of high low memory thermometers can show the value of thatch too.

    Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
     
  7. John Barnes

    John Barnes Member

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    Those looking to build soils with cover crops should search for the following youtube video - Gabe Brown: Keys To Building a Healthy Soil.

    Sent from my SM-N920R4 using Tapatalk
     
  8. Creek chub

    Creek chub Active Member

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    Location:
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    Anybody throw and mow Sunn Hemp with cool season crops?
     
  9. Bowman

    Bowman Member

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    Location:
    USDA Zone 4b
    Hardiness Zone:
    5
    So I presume that this will work on a smooth and level plot also.
     
  10. DocHolladay

    DocHolladay Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Murfreesboro, Tennessee
    Hardiness Zone:
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    I am on a smooth plot and it works just fine.
     
  11. shawn cox

    shawn cox Active Member

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    Location:
    South Georgia
    Not with cool season crops but I have done it for a spring planting and it works fine for me. I have taken some I had left over last year and I did throw it down at the end of summer and it came up and I didn't have any thatch over it.
     
  12. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Huntingdon Co. PA
    Hardiness Zone:
    6a
    Clo
    You're talking about sunlight, which you've got to have some to grow a crop, but full sunlight is not required for a nice plot. My best ladino clover plots in zone 6B are around half an acre in size with mature trees around the perimeter creating partial shade. And the tallest clover in my bigger fields is along the shaded edges, because of better moisture retention in hot and dry weather. If I were to make a new half acre field in the woods north /south for sun would be the least of my priorities in planning.
     
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  13. pinetag

    pinetag Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Virginia
    Hardiness Zone:
    7a
    The plots I am planning are all going to be less than a 1/2 acre and my land is mostly flat river bottom, with a few wetlands mixed in. I don't think I'll have much of a problem with moisture retention, if anything it will be the opposite. We shall see as this will be my first attempt at plotting! I foresee lots of experimenting in my future. LOL!
     
  14. dtabor

    dtabor Member

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    Location:
    Lake Elmore, VT
    Hardiness Zone:
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    So Im still learning this no till method. Last year, late summer, when I went to plant and roll/mow the winter rye from the previous fall, it was a super thick mat and nothing even started to grow. I ended up using a small ATV disc to chew up the dead rye and soil to plant. Was this because I had planted the rye too heavy the previous fall? I try to use the measurements from LickCreek when planting. This spring I went out and it doesnt seem too bad, yet, as we are just starting to get some good greenup. I plan to keep and eye on it and monitor how thick it seems to get.

    What do you all do about leaves that fall into the plot? Ive seen people mention blowing them off in the fall but hate to be making that much commotion around hunting seasons! Mine are mainly Maple with a few oak leaves I have cut the edges back but with the fall winds the leaves continue to make it into the plot. This makes it next to impossible to frost seed anything in the early spring as well.

    Any other tips would be appreciated.
     
  15. MarkDarvin

    MarkDarvin Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Fordville, ND
    Hardiness Zone:
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    1. Cut down the source of the leaves.
    2. Add lime.

    Might be an earthworm shortage. I've never had trouble with accumulated leaves, even in completely canopied white clover.
     
  16. SwampCat

    SwampCat Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    SW AR
    Hardiness Zone:
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    I have no tips other than to keep trying. I am certainly no expert - planting my first throw n mow plot last fall. I have planted conventional tillage food plots for forty years - doing it for a living during most of that - but I am new to throw n mow. On a scale of one to ten - I would say my throw n mow of rye, wheat, and ladino clover was a three or four. My conventional plots last year were eights. I got absolutely no clover in my throw n mow and the rest of the plot was a little thin. It was extremely dry last fall, and I am sure it affected the success - I know it did the conventional plots. I think with throw n mow, timing is more critical getting a rain not too long after planting. I am going to try again this fall - but dont know what I would do different.
     
  17. Chestnut Valley Farms

    Chestnut Valley Farms Active Member

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    Hardiness Zone:
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    Anyone tried lightly broadcasting grain sorghum into a clover plot before mowing? I have a 2 acre destination clover plot that I am considering this for a little security structure within the plot. Do not want to choke out the clover but thought I may take advantage of some of the nitrogen it fixes into the soil
     
  18. Creek chub

    Creek chub Active Member

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    Location:
    Virginia
    That may work if you seed lightly. Could shade the clover during summer stress period.
     
  19. Scott44

    Scott44 Active Member

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    Location:
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    I am going to be doing this in the near future with a sorghum mix
     
  20. Chestnut Valley Farms

    Chestnut Valley Farms Active Member

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    Hardiness Zone:
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    I have seen milo/sorghum growing on the edge of the hwy. Also seen it reseed intself. I'm thinking its worth a shot. Just wish I would have done it already. Getting a little late in the growing season here in MO. Hell may be worth throwing a handful of turnips in the mix as well. Double and triple cropping:)
     

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