Thoughts on diverse fall mix

Discussion in 'Food Plots for Wildlife' started by weekender21, Jul 24, 2019.

  1. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Hawaii/North Carolina
    Hardiness Zone:
    6b
    I'm planning to broadcast the below mix this fall. Potential opportunities will be the last week of August or second week in September. I'll pass on the August planting if there is no rain in the immediate forecast. I plan to spray then broadcast the seed. All of the plots have some buckwheat growth in addition to what's remaining of my fall 2018 and March 2019 plantings.

    -Zone 6B
    -Initial PH 5.6, should be climbing after lime applications
    -Goal; attraction late September-January

    Per acre:
    50LBS WR
    25LBS Oats
    15LBS WW

    5LBS MRC
    5LBS Crimson Clover
    5LBS Berseem Clover
    5LBS Balansa Fixation Clover

    2LBS PTT
    2LBS DER
    2LBS DR
     
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  2. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    That looks like a lot heavier seeding than I am accustomed to seeing. The only time I see 100 lbs of grains recommended is when you don't have other things mixed in. If I planted that much rye, it would completely choke out everything else. I know, because I have made that mistake before.

    My only other suggestion would be to get some chicory in that mix. It will do well this fall and they will eat it like candy all next year.
    Here is what I've done before that worked well for me:

    Mixed Grains = 50 lbs
    Mixed Clovers = 10 lbs
    Chicory = 2 lbs
    Brassicas = 2 lbs

    For throw and mow this might be increased some.

    Best wishes!
     
  3. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    Thanks Native!

    Yes, this is throw and mow...maybe even just throw. I’m assuming a lower germination and some seed depredation from birds etc.


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  4. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    I think you may be a bit late for brassica at your elevation but I guess it shouldn't hurt. Mix looks good. I have done combo mixes which are good but I get better results overseeding spent brassica in Oct with my grain/clover mix. Brassica bulbs remain but bare dirt takes on the other seed well with good feed thru fall/winter/early spring.
    I just did my brassica planting T&M this past week as daughter has my schedule screwed up with baby dropping out. I didn't measure but I have sensitive hands and it felt like I used 2# PTT, 2# DER, 1# Lettuce, 2# Daikon with 160# Urea/ac. Mowed, Threw seed, sprayed. I usually don't spray but had let this field go fallow somewhat. Usually don't mow, but growth was too high to get seed to spread with my Solo. Good luck.
     
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  5. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    Hardiness Zone:
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    I unfortunately don’t have the luxury of proper timing and likely won’t even hunt my land this year past the first few days of the September opener.

    I wonder if I’d be better off with a heavy planting of cereal grain and annual clover and skip the rest. Maybe a heavy seeding of BW next summer then rinse and repeat until I get there permanently.


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    Last edited: Jul 24, 2019
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  6. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    ^^^^ Yep with that said, thats what I would do. Throw in come Daikon and all will give you good hunting plot quickly with minimal work and expense. May want to hit with high N for quick growth for your short window.
     
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  7. Creek chub

    Creek chub Active Member

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    Location:
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    I’m contemplating a mix as well with similar soil conditions.
    I’m leaning towards the following per acre:
    75# WR
    5# crimson clover
    5-7# medium red clover
    The following spring plan to go all buckwheat followed by WR/Durana combo in hopes of establishing a perennial clover plot
     
  8. BenAllgood

    BenAllgood Member

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    Location:
    Louisiana and Kentucky (Zone 6B)
    I'm in a similar situation with limited time and distance restrictions. I was going to go with this:

    Awnless wheat - 80 lbs/ac
    Crimson clover - 20 lbs/ac
    Red clover - 20 lbs/ac
    Arrowleaf clover- 20 lbs/ac

    Doing a spray and throw the first week of September. I'm hoping that mix will last all year and get me to next September.

    Recommendation by Dr. Harper.
     
  9. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    Craig Harper recommended 60lbs of annual clover per acre with 80lbs cereal grains? That seems like way too much clover.


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  10. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    Hardiness Zone:
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    Any thoughts on adding AWP's to the mix? Just curious on the pro's/cons.
     
  11. BenAllgood

    BenAllgood Member

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    Location:
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    Actually, it was 30 lbs. I doubled it because of my spray and throw method. I don't have the right tools for the job, so my germination is not going to be good. Here's a slide from one of his presentations. Screenshot_20190725-052804_Drive.jpg
     
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  12. Creek chub

    Creek chub Active Member

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    Location:
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    30# still seems high per acre. I think you’ll be fine germination wise since clover is a small seed that should work its way down thru any thatch and germinate
     
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  13. DRandall90

    DRandall90 Member

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    Location:
    Minnesota
    Hardiness Zone:
    3
    The biggest con is they can get mowed down when they are very young quite often, unless you are planting a huge area. I would skip them, but if you must, I believe you can buy forage peas which do the same thing and are much cheaper. I do AWP because I have had good luck, but generally that's on a larger acreage.
     
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  14. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    I wouldn't mind adding an "ice cream" crop to my list but will have to check the price in my area.
     
  15. DRandall90

    DRandall90 Member

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    Location:
    Minnesota
    Hardiness Zone:
    3
    I love AWP as a food plot. I just know that my first year we only planted about 1 acre and they mowed it down as soon as it came up, well before the hunting season.

    I would say the nice thing in my area is that AWP usually go in before the "last minute plantings" can go in, so if you see them heavily browsed right away, you can overseed into them with something like WW or WR.
     
  16. George

    George Well-Known Member

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    That is a lot of seed in that mix. The 2# of rape and 2# of turnips would be a full one acre planting for me.

    G
     
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  17. William Allis

    William Allis New Member

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    Location:
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    We don't use 50# cereal grain per acre, unless that is all we are planting. But we are planting on a prepared seed bed. We use 30# cereal grain, with 15# mixed brassica's. When we reseed clover we cut it down more, 20# cereal grain, 8-10 mixed brassica's and 20 # mixed red and white clover. Our cereal grain mix: 2x oats, 2x winter rye, 1x buckwheat and 1x field peas. Brassica mix is 1x purple globe turnip, 1x 7-top turnip greens, 1x rape and 1x Daikon radish. Clover mix: 2x Jumbo ladino , 2x Platilnum ladino, 2x AberLasting white, 2x Freedom red, 2x Gallant red and 1x chicory.

    We are in WNY (8) heavy soil with clay and stone. Have never tried spray, sow and mow, I think our soil is too heavy. We are doing bottom plow in spring and then run the tiller over it in July and use the cultimulcher when planting an early Aug.

    Bill
     
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  18. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

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    I’m dropping the PTT and rape. Still planning to add the radishes.


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  19. farmhunter

    farmhunter Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    not a big mix fan. I do it sometimes like everyone. -
    but I've had better luck with single culture target plots - I feel like I can address the needs better and maximize results easier - rather than being a catch-all-jack-of-all-trades-master-of-none type plot. I might not feel the same if I only had one or two plots to work with though. plant the same mix in monoculture strips -and put a camera on it and the deer will tell you what they prefer.
     
  20. DRandall90

    DRandall90 Member

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    Location:
    Minnesota
    Hardiness Zone:
    3
    As far as individual season success goes, I can agree with you here to an extent. If I could get away with a single planting in some plots I would. And planting in strips is great to understand your herd!

    I use mixes for a couple reasons:
    1. Fall plantings with a cereal grain (usually WW/Rye up here) and clover help to get something growing quickly for browse so brassicas/AWP don't get wiped out right away.
    2. Fall planted clover is the #1 way I ensure I can have a good clover stand in spring. If I try to go with a monoculture, like rye, it's difficult to establish clover in spring until the melt water comes off my plots, since the seeds tend to wash away. The fall planted clover are usually able to hang on in the soil with an established root system.
    3. The alleopathic impacts of fall grains have been extremely noticeable, especially for my no till land.
    4. I need soil building materials. I try to avoid fertilizer/lime as much as possible on some plots because they are too close to a watershed for my liking if they leeched off. Another reason I don't like to till ground either.
     
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