The Forbidden Apple Tree Knowledge Thread

Discussion in 'Fruit Trees' started by Native Hunter, May 14, 2017.

  1. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,640
    Likes Received:
    5,803
    Location:
    Kentucky (Zone 6B)
    Merle, yes I think you can save it. Best of luck, and let us know how it turns out.
     
    Merle Hawggard likes this.
  2. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,640
    Likes Received:
    5,803
    Location:
    Kentucky (Zone 6B)
    Yes, the north has many advantages when it comes to apples, and many wild apples are excellent. One thing, however, that you get from grafted varieties is known qualities and known drop times. Mr. @chansaw on this forum has 6,000 or more wild apple trees if I remember correctly, and they do an excellent job for him. But, he is also planting many grafted varieties.

    PS - I would love to see a wild apple tree, but I've never seen one to my knowledge in my life. That kind of thing doesn't happen much in my parts.
     
    Chipdasqrrl likes this.
  3. Merle Hawggard

    Merle Hawggard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    719
    Likes Received:
    600
    Location:
    Clay co arkansas


    Sent from my SM-G960U1 using Tapatalk
     
    Native Hunter likes this.
  4. Merle Hawggard

    Merle Hawggard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    719
    Likes Received:
    600
    Location:
    Clay co arkansas
    She is standing again. I'll swap out the ratchet straps for wire cable next week. Going to run that through old water hose where it meets the tree.
    Pics don't show, but we spread a 5055 bucket full of dirt around it too.
    I'll build more bluebird houses for the posts this winter making them extra useful. [​IMG][​IMG]

    Sent from my SM-G960U1 using Tapatalk
     
  5. Merle Hawggard

    Merle Hawggard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    719
    Likes Received:
    600
    Location:
    Clay co arkansas
    I should add this is the tree I made a side graft on with a crab rootstock after it was almost completely girdled.
    The b118 is directly under the tree.

    Sent from my SM-G960U1 using Tapatalk
     
    letemgrow and Native Hunter like this.
  6. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,640
    Likes Received:
    5,803
    Location:
    Kentucky (Zone 6B)
    Nice work Merle.
     
    Merle Hawggard likes this.
  7. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,640
    Likes Received:
    5,803
    Location:
    Kentucky (Zone 6B)
    Bumping this thread to the top for someone who is asking how save their B118 trees that are falling over. See Post # 78.
     
    g squared 23 likes this.
  8. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,640
    Likes Received:
    5,803
    Location:
    Kentucky (Zone 6B)
    I have some important advice for anyone who is planting apple and pear trees - Take Frost Pockets into consideration. Frost Pockets occur at low ground where cold air can fall and settle. Remember - warmer air rises and colder air falls. Many years, just a degree or two of temperature can be the difference between a bumper crop and a total failure. I'm not saying to completely avoid planting trees in low areas, but I would recommend using some restraint until you can gauge how bad the impact might be on your particular piece of ground.

    Telling my own personal experience with my frost pocket at my farm is the best illustration that I can give for this subject. At one point in time, all of my trees were planted on high ground away from my low ground. However, in 2014, I decided to add a few more trees, and I planted some in the low area and some on the high ground with the other trees. Since that time the difference in fruiting has been dramatic. Shown below are some bullet points with the most important facts:
    • In the low ground area, The pear trees I planted in 2014 have never been able to produce. Last year one of the trees had 4 or 5 pears on it, and that is the only pears I've ever seen down there. However, the pears on the high ground started producing 4 years after they were planted, and have been doing great ever since then. The two groups of trees are only 300 yards apart, and the only difference is the elevation.
    • Even though the pear trees in the low area haven't been able to produce, they have grown big. They are much larger than the trees that have been producing. That make perfect sense, because if you aren't making fruit, you have more energy to devote to vegetative growth.
    • The apples and crabapples in the low area have been able to produce some, but they have not been as productive as the trees on the high ground. It looks like that could possibly change this year. They are loaded with blooms, and unless we have an unusual late freeze, they look to be on par with the high ground trees this year.
    • This year, the pear tree blooms in the low area have already been frozen out again. They are already black and falling off the trees. The high ground pears, however, look great and have a fine fruit set.
    • Persimmons and Sawtooths are not affected by the frost pocket. In the last 10 years, I have only seen one bad crop with those species. That was a year when we had a very unusual late freeze in May.
    I just wanted to pass this information along and hope that it might help others. PS - unless we have an unusual late freeze, it looks like 2022 could be the best apple and pear crop I have seen in my life. Take care. and good growing.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2022
  9. KSQ2

    KSQ2 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,315
    Likes Received:
    1,249
    Location:
    SE Kansas
    Hardiness Zone:
    6
    Valuable information Native, thanks! The majority of the 11 acres here at the house is low, by pure luck we managed to plant our apple and pears on some of the higher ground of our place, it’s not exactly high, but relative to the rest of our place it is. 3 years in to letting them fruit, they have done very well. All the fruit trees we’ve planted on the Massey are on substantially higher ground, on the hillside of where we hope to build one day. So we should be good to go. We’re still a few years away from any fruiting over there.
     
    Native Hunter likes this.
  10. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,640
    Likes Received:
    5,803
    Location:
    Kentucky (Zone 6B)
    That’s good to hear. Near the top of a south facing slope at my home seems to be the best place I have for apples. They really pump out the fruit. I’ve only had one issue at this location - I had a Liberty destroyed by sunscald. Other than that it had been smooth sailing. Good luck with your trees.
     
  11. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    Likes Received:
    4,050
    Location:
    Huntingdon Co. PA
    Hardiness Zone:
    6a
    I had an opportunity that I couldn't resist; our local county conservation district has a tree sale every year, and this year they had Liberty and Goldrush Apples, bare root 5/8" dia. for $14. Even though I wasn't looking for more apples and Goldrush is an mostly an average choice (we have no trouble with CAR here) Liberty is a great apple variety that I didn't have yet, so I had to get a few of each. And some blueberries for good measure. Planting more fruit trees is an addiction.
     
  12. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,640
    Likes Received:
    5,803
    Location:
    Kentucky (Zone 6B)
    To illustrate what I have stated above about frost pockets, go to the following link. Once apples reach full pink, only 3 degrees of temperature makes the difference between a 10% kill and a 90% kill. Now does the frost pocket problem make sense?

    Critical Temperatures for Frost Damage on Fruit Trees (usu.edu)
     
    Mennoniteman likes this.
  13. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,640
    Likes Received:
    5,803
    Location:
    Kentucky (Zone 6B)
    If you have no CAR, Goldrush is actually a good choice. Several people I know really like it as an eating apple, and it drops late. That's a good price for those trees if they are on a desirable rootstock.
     
  14. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    Likes Received:
    4,050
    Location:
    Huntingdon Co. PA
    Hardiness Zone:
    6a
    That's an interesting chart, it's interesting how it's showing a very consistent temperature tolerance pattern among the different fruits, once trees are in full bloom 28 degrees is pretty much the limit, with apples being a little fragile than the other fruits.
    Planting trees on a south or west slope where there is good air drainage is key, and one thing that some people can do to help this is to remove downslope obstacles such as trees and vegetation to help that air drainage. There should be at least a 60' wide opening downslope for air to move through, with experts recommending going as far as leveling out dips and humps in the ground contour below an orchard, and mowing grass as valid practices to draw cold air downslope from an orchard.
     
    massey likes this.
  15. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,640
    Likes Received:
    5,803
    Location:
    Kentucky (Zone 6B)
    Good thoughts MM. Move the cold air out.
     
  16. coolbrze0

    coolbrze0 Active Member

    Messages:
    259
    Likes Received:
    87
    Location:
    VA
    Hardiness Zone:
    6b
    MM you got that right!
     
  17. coolbrze0

    coolbrze0 Active Member

    Messages:
    259
    Likes Received:
    87
    Location:
    VA
    Hardiness Zone:
    6b
    You are corrrect, it doesn't take much to go from 10-90%. I read a lot from the VT ag extension & they put out some great info! I've been planing about 20 fruit trees each year in my orchard here in the mountains & truly love it! 5 strand high tensile electric fence going in at the moment to keep bears out even though our bear #s dropped drastically the last 2 years due to mange..
     
  18. RGrizzzz

    RGrizzzz Active Member

    Messages:
    325
    Likes Received:
    136
    Location:
    Home: 19468 Camp: 17771
    Hardiness Zone:
    6a
    That's a great price! To bad they were pick up only.
     
  19. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    Likes Received:
    4,050
    Location:
    Huntingdon Co. PA
    Hardiness Zone:
    6a
    Yes, a great price, and to add to that, these trees had all of their total root system attached, their 1/2" trees measured 5/8" and their 5/8" trees measured 3/4", and they arrived looking like they were dug yesterday, unlike the last several orders that I received from other nurseries. It's interesting that the County Conservation District can get nice stock like this, and always seems to have nicer trees than the mail order nurseries. It shows that great customer service is still possible. I will be posting some pics of these once they leaf out.
     
    KSQ2 and RGrizzzz like this.
  20. coolbrze0

    coolbrze0 Active Member

    Messages:
    259
    Likes Received:
    87
    Location:
    VA
    Hardiness Zone:
    6b
    That's awesome, I would have grabbed a bunch also! Had piss poor luck w/ my purchase last year, I went w/ The Wildlife Group & while the majority of the trees were OK, many were very thin & a lot of them had almost no roots on them. I've purchased from 5? places over the years & by far that was the worst experience. They said they would make it right last year after 5 out of 20 didn't leaf our but it's like pulling teeth to get them to reply now. Will NEVER purchase from TWG again! I lost more of their 20 trees than I've lost out of the entire 130 or so that I have from prev orders!
     
    RGrizzzz likes this.

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. gurgalunas
Total: 89 (members: 1, guests: 14, robots: 74)
(moderators are listed in blue)