The Forbidden Apple Tree Knowledge Thread

Discussion in 'Fruit Trees' started by Native Hunter, May 14, 2017.

  1. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,150
    Likes Received:
    3,286
    Location:
    Kentucky (Zone 6B)
    Good update. We appreciate the info!
     
  2. Hillfarm

    Hillfarm Member

    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    31
    Location:
    Maysville, KY
    Hardiness Zone:
    6
    I wish I could have found this thread and this site sooner. After writing to you about my fruit tree list, I may have gotten some "Hippy-Dippy apples that are from the bowels of DR hell".
     
  3. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,150
    Likes Received:
    3,286
    Location:
    Kentucky (Zone 6B)
    Many a poor wayfaring apple sojourners have found themselves engulfed in the bowels of DR hell. It is like a fifth dimension beyond that which is known to man - as vast as space and as timeless as infinity. It is the middle ground between light and shadow, between science and superstition, and it lies between the pit of the apple grower's fears, and the summit of his knowledge.

    The Hippy-Dippy crowd will forever be immersed in their endless chemical sprays, but seekers of truth (like us) shall adjust our paths and overcome lest we perish.
     
    Hillfarm likes this.
  4. Hillfarm

    Hillfarm Member

    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    31
    Location:
    Maysville, KY
    Hardiness Zone:
    6
    I won't use synthetic medicine, chemicals, fertilizers, or cleaners. I was thinking of spraying a few problem trees with an aerated compost tea mixture. I have seen it turn around some pretty sick specimens. Oh well, this subject is for another thread.
    Do you have a thread on drop times of the fruit trees you have bearing? I think that would be interesting, and useful, to us novice types. I'm trying to plan a October (and later) dropping section, a Sept, Aug, July, June dropping times sectons in my planting area. I also will try to sprinkle in very late drop fruits, in every section to keep them moving through the area, in late ML season.
     
  5. buckvelvet

    buckvelvet Active Member

    Messages:
    146
    Likes Received:
    91
    Location:
    Mason County, MI 5A
    The trees (very limited amount) at my house orchard, not a lot of room there, It was my first year planting (didn't graft yet) and I bought some varieties I thought i'd like, they just happen to come on M7.

    The excitement to begin a new journey is sometimes to quick to become a reward, similar to any such sayings of this microwave mentality society.
     
    Hillfarm and Native Hunter like this.
  6. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,150
    Likes Received:
    3,286
    Location:
    Kentucky (Zone 6B)
    I don't have a thread on the drop times, and I don't have it written down. I do have it in my head (which is dangerous). I intend someday to take my list that you have seen and add all this extra info + any insight into any of those varieties.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2019
  7. TreeDaddy

    TreeDaddy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    609
    Likes Received:
    329
    Location:
    walton,texas
    before this thread, I didn't know rootstock from woodstock

    just got my 30 tree fruit package from Wildlife Group

    first time ever planting grafted rootstock

    here we go............

    bill
     
    Hillfarm likes this.
  8. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,150
    Likes Received:
    3,286
    Location:
    Kentucky (Zone 6B)
    Bill came out of Woodstock - landed in Rootstock - and is headed for the Comstock Lode of fruit.....
     
    Hillfarm likes this.
  9. TreeDaddy

    TreeDaddy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    609
    Likes Received:
    329
    Location:
    walton,texas
    ......my F150 is loaded with mulch,pea pebbles ,welded wire,T posts,PVC,roll of window screens,staplers,metal tags,shovels for the weekend.......

    bill
     
    Hillfarm and Native Hunter like this.
  10. Keith Nehrke

    Keith Nehrke Member

    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    34
    My F150 is loaded with a flip-over tent, flasher, tip-ups, and a BBQ grill for making venison dogs on the ice ;). We're at least two or three months from planting season up here in Yankee country. But I can dream...
     
    TreeDaddy and g squared 23 like this.
  11. buckvelvet

    buckvelvet Active Member

    Messages:
    146
    Likes Received:
    91
    Location:
    Mason County, MI 5A
    Yeah we might plant trees idk....in May? It's -30 windchill this morning......whiteouts, the works. Yee haw!
     
  12. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,150
    Likes Received:
    3,286
    Location:
    Kentucky (Zone 6B)
    After years of hearing on the Internet of how great B118 rootstock is for apples, it seems that - Houston We Have a Problem!! A guy started a thread on another forum about how many of his trees have started to lean. I saw the same exact thing this spring with a B118 tree that I gave to my FIL. It was growing really well and a moderate wind storm this spring laid it over, He currently has ropes on it. Also just communicated with a friend, and he has B118 trees starting to lean. I started researching it, and it seems that this is a common problem with B118 is some places. We already knew that this was a problem with M7 and now we know it can also be a problem with B118.

    I am so glad that the majority of my semi dwarf apples are on MM111. I've never seen the first sign of any problems with any of them. I only got some B118 trees in the last couple of years. I set some of those deep so that they would root above the graft, so hopefully those will be okay.

    I'm not going to say any more about this. I'm "Teed Off" right now and might say too much...... But, if it's on the Internet and someone says something is good, it must be true....right????
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2019
    g squared 23 likes this.
  13. Matt Casto

    Matt Casto New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    West Virginia kanawha/Jackson counties
    I’m new to grafting apple trees has anyone had issues with grafting Arkansas black onto m111? They have took but this far have only grew 3-6inches where other variety’s have grown anywhere from 9 inches to 2 feet.
     
  14. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,150
    Likes Received:
    3,286
    Location:
    Kentucky (Zone 6B)
    I've not heard on this issue with AB, but I've never grafted any of them either. Hopefully someone who has will chime in.
     
  15. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,150
    Likes Received:
    3,286
    Location:
    Kentucky (Zone 6B)
  16. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,150
    Likes Received:
    3,286
    Location:
    Kentucky (Zone 6B)
    I recommend that everyone interested in apples read the following article which quotes Kerik D. Cox, a plant pathologist who has studied the disease of fireblight for a decade at Cornell College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Some other experts, such as George Sundin at Michigan State are quoted as well.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/12/02/...ads-northward-threatening-apple-orchards.html

    However, if you don't want to read the whole thing, I have summarized what I feel are the most important parts:
    • Fireblight is spreading to places where it had not been seen before. Examples are New York’s Champlain Valley and parts of Maine. Many places in the north are now experiencing what they thought was only a southern problem.
    • At places where the disease was hardly ever thought about in times past, entire orchards have been destroyed in recent years.
    • What I have said earlier in this thread about dwarfing and semi-dwarfing trees being more of an issues is being echoed by others. Example: In this artice George Sundin was quoted as saying, “...The old-style trees that we used to grow were big and had tons of branches and the bacteria couldn’t move through the tree very well...In these new trees, “the branches are smaller and it’s a short distance from the branch to the tree and down to the roots.”
    So there you have it. Basically, when choosing apple varieties, resistance to FB should be a major concern, and rootstock should be a concern as well. I think this article certainly backs up a lot of what I have posted earlier in this thread concerning my theories
     
  17. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,723
    Likes Received:
    2,468
    Location:
    Monroe County, WV
    I didn't need opinions from University icons to know you were right all along Native. Glad they finally caught up with your knowledge. Good read anyway, thanks.
     
    Chainsaw, TreeDaddy and Native Hunter like this.
  18. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,150
    Likes Received:
    3,286
    Location:
    Kentucky (Zone 6B)
    Thanks Dogghr, and I’m just glad those university icons are reading our forum .....;)
     
  19. Chipdasqrrl

    Chipdasqrrl Active Member

    Messages:
    453
    Likes Received:
    207
    Location:
    Northern Michigan
    Hardiness Zone:
    5
    This is an underrated thread. I’ve read through it a few times and there’s a whole bunch of information that is well worth the reading.. thanks for taking the time to share it!


    Sent from my iPhone using Deer Hunter Forum
     
    TreeDaddy and Native Hunter like this.
  20. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,723
    Likes Received:
    2,468
    Location:
    Monroe County, WV
    Of course they do, just like the old QDMuknowwhat always did ....and still do.
     
    Chainsaw and Native Hunter like this.

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. BuenaGooch,
  2. Zeek,
  3. Reagan
Total: 74 (members: 3, guests: 59, robots: 12)
(moderators are listed in blue)