Texas oak

Discussion in 'Native Habitat Management' started by E_308, Nov 6, 2019.

  1. E_308

    E_308 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    NE Missouri
    I am at a conference in San Antonio. The grounds have a bunch of these oaks loaded with acorns.

    [​IMG]

    What are they and how far north will they grow?


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  2. 144

    144 Active Member

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    Location:
    North LA
    Could be wrong, but it looks like a live oak. Not sure on how far north they’ll go, but you could check USDA to see their recommendations.


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  3. OkieKubota

    OkieKubota Moderator Staff Member

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    Location:
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    We have some in southern Cherokee county in NE Oklahoma. I have not seen any up here in the northern part of the county but if they grow there they should be fine here...
     
  4. SwampCat

    SwampCat Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    SW AR
    Hardiness Zone:
    7
    Problem with live oak - they keep leaves a long time. Ice is not their friend.
     
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  5. E_308

    E_308 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    I have half a dozen acorns in the carry on, we will see if they like northern Mo.
     
  6. TX-Aggie

    TX-Aggie Member

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    Location:
    Texas, Property in Southwest Missouri
    Live Oak, everything SwampCat said is true - they do drop leaves, but never all of them. Almost a year long continuous drop of leaves with other green leaves growing, with heaviest drops over the winters and extreme drought. They also love to become popsicles during ice storms, and then snap limbs. I don't know if they will grow further north, however, I would not recommend planting near any buildings or power lines type areas. They can get huge though - see the link for the Century Tree at Texas A&M for how large they can get
    https://www.tamu.edu/traditions/aggie-culture/century-tree/

    Mine at my home in Texas are probably 8-9 years old and starting to produce their first true acorn crop (I had 3-4 produced the last year or two, but this year they are producing well)
     
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  7. Fishman

    Fishman Active Member

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    Location:
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    I agree that it is a live oak. Live oaks are in the white oak family so the acorns do not need a stratification period and need to be planted this fall.
     

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