Roller crimping

Discussion in 'Food Plots for Wildlife' started by Baker, Mar 26, 2018.

  1. rusty1034

    rusty1034 Member

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    Location:
    St. Lawrence County NY
    Hardiness Zone:
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    It will work great ! It’s called ‘throw and mow’. I try and do the same thing except I use winter rye as the ‘mow’ portion.
     
  2. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Huntingdon Co. PA
    Hardiness Zone:
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    Baker, thanks for the great pictures and info, I'd like to try it next year. Farmers around here are doing this a lot the last few years. And using less fertilizer and very little herbicide in the process. Here's a field of 3 week old corn in rolled rye right beside my house: WP_20180623_13_18_00_Pro.jpg
     
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  3. Double L

    Double L Active Member

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    Location:
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    Baker. Thanks for the updates. Does your roller oscillate side to side a little or is it ridged? I’m talking about your front end loader attachment. I’m gonna start my build this week on mine.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  4. Pacahunter

    Pacahunter Member

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    I have been thinking about this : how does a light pass from an offset disc work as a crimper? I know it might not lay the rye down as picture perfect as an actual crimper, but a used crimper is impossible to find around here, and a new one runs $5-$6k.
    I’ve had rye just lay down on the first couple passes when I’ve disced it before, and I’d sooner invest the $6k in a no till planter.
    Thoughts?
     
  5. Baker

    Baker Well-Known Member

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    Its rigid > I made the jig for the FEL. Buts its rigid front or back
     
  6. Baker

    Baker Well-Known Member

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    If given a choice between a crimper and a no till drill I'd choose the drill every time. It does a somewhat job of laying down the previous crop and gly can finish the job.
     
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  7. Double L

    Double L Active Member

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    I just picked up my pipe today to make my crimper. I was thinking of making it 9' wide to use with my 8' Drill. since you have been using yours do think the 6" on each side would be a benefit? also do you think having a little side to side motion would help it follow the contour of the ground better with out putting stress on loader arm?
     
  8. Baker

    Baker Well-Known Member

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    I think the 6" either side will be fine. Can only help if you double crimp a little.I can't answer the question of the side motion for your tractor but I doubt it will be a problem.

    Only thing we noticed having the crimper on the front vs back is if you crimp without the drill on back it takes weight off front wheels making steering a bit challenging. Not an issue if drill on back. We are fairly flat so have little experience with land contours. That said if you have shallow pockets or some roll the crimper may not get in as much there.

    Lastly when you are welding the blades on the pipe the research I did determined you want to be sure and use the chevron pattern vs. straight as it does a much better job terminated the cover. Also we can fill our crimper up with water making it much heavier which is very advantageous.
     
  9. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    More critical than the roller design is the stage that the rye is in when rolled. If it is like grass it's very likely to stand up again. If it's mature and hollow stemmed it's not going to stand up again even with a shoddy rolling job. As far as the no-till vs. rolling, next year I'm going to experiment with doing no-till soybeans in standing rye without rolling, the reason being that the newly sprouted soybeans will be partially hidden from deer and turkeys' in the initial sprouting stage, allowing the crop to get established better before wildlife starts to decimate it. I'd be doing this in fairly mature rye. Does anyone have an opinion on the effectiveness of hiding the beans? Might I need to spray roundup on the rye to get this to work? The main problem I have is the Turkeys' will clip the newly emerged beans' like a lawnmower, wiping out large patches of them.
     
  10. catscratch

    catscratch Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    A local farmer sprayed his rye and no-tilled into it while standing. I don't know it helps hide the beans but the field looks great from a habitat guys point of view.

    Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
     
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  11. SwampCat

    SwampCat Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    I used to plant beans with a 3 pt spreader. I always would get some bean seeds thrown out in the adjacent pasture when I tuned at the end of the row. Those beans would sprout and grow and were subjected to much less browsing pressure. My plan for next year, now that I have a woods seeder - is to plant directly into standing wheat or rye. There will still be plenty standing after one pass to provide cover. I will spray with gly a month or so after planting if need be
     
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  12. Baker

    Baker Well-Known Member

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    I have an 18 acre field that is red brick clay. Hard as a rock!. I call it my science project and have been working for years to try and loosen soil. When wet it grows well but cracks wide open when dry. I planted a bit over 11 lbs sunn hemp/acre along with some buckwheat, soybeans, cowpeas and sunflower. IMG_4770.JPG . Everything came up and the buckwheat went to seed. Then we had a rainy week and the sunn hemp exploded! I decided to mow it back to about 2-3' and let it start growing again. I understand this causes more root growth which I think may help that tough soil. I did about half the field. It got quite tall and thick choking everything else out .
     
  13. FarmerD

    FarmerD Active Member

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    Location:
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    " As far as the no-till vs. rolling, next year I'm going to experiment with doing no-till soybeans in standing rye without rolling, the reason being that the newly sprouted soybeans will be partially hidden from deer and turkeys' in the initial sprouting stage, allowing the crop to get established better before wildlife starts to decimate it. I'd be doing this in fairly mature rye. Does anyone have an opinion on the effectiveness of hiding the beans? Might I need to spray roundup on the rye to get this to work? The main problem I have is the Turkeys' will clip the newly emerged beans' like a lawnmower, wiping out large patches of them."

    Just a thought, but maybe using a weed wiper on your bucket, ahead of the no-till planter with a 50/50 solution of glyphosate, will kill off the rye and they'll fall over at a later date, shielding your beans. I think you have a good idea of trying to leave the rye standing for an extra couple of weeks. If you used one of the new vining, soybeans or even cowpeas (or a mix), you might have a winner there.
     
  14. Pacahunter

    Pacahunter Member

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    Location:
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    My rye laid down pretty nice with a pass from my disc. It’s not as picture perfect as a crimper but the goal was definitely achieved.
     
  15. CTM1

    CTM1 Active Member

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    Location:
    Colchester, NY
    Curious about thoughts on a sickle bar mower instead of a crimper. Broadcast brassica (no drill) and cut with sickle bar mower to lay the rye down on top of seed?
     
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  16. catscratch

    catscratch Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Kansas It's better to wear out than to rust out.
    A sickle bar is high on my priority list! Been wanting to try one with throw-n-mow for a long time. Try it and let us know how it works for ya.
    Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
     
  17. Pacahunter

    Pacahunter Member

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    Depends on when u cut it. If u cut it before it gets seed, it will just grow right back. Crimping the stalk kills it, where mowing won’t
     

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