Regenerative plotting questions

Discussion in 'Food Plots for Wildlife' started by jackson13, Jul 24, 2021.

  1. jackson13

    jackson13 New Member

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    Location:
    South east Kansas
    This year I have planted some ground to green cover seeds “summer release blend” it seems like many people plant mixes like this for foodplots, but I really planted it to try to improve the soil.

    With that being said I would like to plant the “fall release blend” in the same fields.

    I have a Great Plains no till drill that I can use and also a roller crimper if needed.

    My thoughts are that most of the species are going to be seeded out and will break down to the ground creating somewhat of a mulch when I plant. But I can also see that not knocking down enough of the tall plants in the mix and needing to use the crimper in front to get more of a uniform mulch.

    Has anyone tried planting a fall foodplot into a summer crop and if so how did it go?


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  2. buckhunter10

    buckhunter10 Well-Known Member

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    I plant mine via broadcast - spray or mow off summer crop.

    However, if I was you - I would attempt to run that drill right through the standing crop. Then, based on how the fields look - run a crimper through thereafter or just leave it.

    I am not sure what is in the summer release blend but I don't think you need to worry much about additional plants photosynthesizing if building soil is your goal. If you have some additional milo still standing (for example) and your fall crop growing up between - I don't see this as a big deal.

    Lot of ways to skin that cat but most likely - running your drill through the field will terminate some of the crops and plant a beautiful fall buffet for the soil and wildlife.

    Just my opinion.

    AT.
     
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  3. KSQ2

    KSQ2 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    SE Kansas
    Hardiness Zone:
    6
    I agree, you have a wonderful tool for regenerative plotting according to what I’ve read. I’d love to have one of those drills in the barn!
     
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  4. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    The no-till drill is huge for what you are doing, but if I had the crimper I'd definitely be using it first. The one question is, how many weeds are mixed in with the first planting? Rolling in the direction that you want to plant and then spraying a round of glyphosate several weeks before drilling the fall mix would also be an option.
     
  5. KSQ2

    KSQ2 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    Hardiness Zone:
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    Looks like my buckwheat experiment is going to have a hiccup or two. The buckwheat looks great, but it couldn’t completely out compete the Johnson grass, can anything? I’m not sure what to do when the buckwheat matures and September rolls around. I was hoping to mow the buckwheat down right over my fall mix seed, but the johnson grass will likely be upwards of 7’ tall. Any suggestions?

    6B55A58C-4336-42C2-B575-9E870066ED19.jpeg
     
  6. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    How about spraying the JG with cleth right now.... The buckwheat will be released and you will kill the JG before it seeds. Also, the dead JG will make some thatch for your fall T&M.
     
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  7. KSQ2

    KSQ2 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    I thought about that, the Johnson grass is pretty tall, but I’ve had decent luck spraying tall Johnson grass with our golf cart rig. I would crush quite a bit of buckwheat with only an 8’ boom. Do you think it would still be worth it to spray?
     
  8. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I think it would be worth it. You need to start sometime killing back the JG, because it will plague your plots from now on. PS: There are some good spot sprayers that will reach out way, way past 8 feet. It might be a good time to check into getting one. I'm thinking with a good spray gun you can reach well past 25+ feet.
     
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  9. KSQ2

    KSQ2 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    I could easily splice in a valve for a hand sprayer on our cart, I might think about that for spot spraying serecia. As for the buckwheat, there is enough Johnson grass that I think the boom will be the way to go.
     
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  10. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Good luck with it and let us know how it turns out.
     
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  11. jackson13

    jackson13 New Member

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    Location:
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    We have a few plots that have quite a bit of foxtail in it. I’m mowing it today and going to spray roundup same day as planting. I am interested to hear how the other idea turns out as well though.


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  12. KSQ2

    KSQ2 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    I can’t mow without hurting the buckwheat, or that’s exactly what I’d do. I got it sprayed today, it was definitely a jungle. Some of the johnson grass was already +6’ tall. On a positive note, the rest of the plot area is in established clover and it’s looking really good. I broadcast some buckwheat leftover buckwheat into the clover and it looks great and doesn’t appear to be hurting the clover at all.
     

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