Poison ivy

Discussion in 'Native Habitat Management' started by buckdeer1, May 13, 2018.

  1. buckdeer1

    buckdeer1 Well-Known Member

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    I don't think I have ever seen as much this year along field edges,anyone know of a broadleaf killer that won't kill everything else
     
  2. catscratch

    catscratch Well-Known Member

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    Get in there and pull it by hand. :)

    Honestly don't know of anything that will target it but not other broad-leafs. I remember when I was a kid we had goats. They loved to eat poison ivy...
     
    1yellowdog likes this.
  3. THE LLC

    THE LLC Well-Known Member

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    I hate that crap. All I can say is if you're a plant and you're growing in with poison ivy, your days are numbered. I use roundup and nuke everything.
     
  4. buckdeer1

    buckdeer1 Well-Known Member

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    I wonder what 24D or some other broadleaf killer would dobut if I don't have any options I will spray with gly
     
  5. pinetag

    pinetag Active Member

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    Agreed. I see it everywhere!

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
     
  6. weekender21

    weekender21 Active Member

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    I brought some home from NC. I even got it on my palm, pretty sure that’s a first. Usually that thicker skin seems to avoid breaking out.

    If you’ve never tried Tecnu I highly recommend it.

    If I know I’ve been exposed I treat those areas of my skin. When used correctly it’s been 100% effective for me.

    Unfortunately this time I wasn’t prepared.


    Sent from my iPhone using Deer Hunter Forum
     
  7. H20fwler

    H20fwler Member

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    My dog keeps getting in it and transferring it to me...thank God for hydrocortisone!
     
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  8. Tap

    Tap Well-Known Member

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    Concentrated Dawn dish soap is an amazing remedy for the rash. Washing with Dawn helps prevent the rash from forming, and if you don't wash in time, you can still get the rash. That's when Dawn really shines. Use it as a salve (don't wash it off) and the itch goes away almost immediately and the rash turns to scab and goes away in a couple days.
    I've been using Dawn for several years and it really works. I've posted threads about it before.
    And I'm no stranger to poison ivy...we have jungles of the stuff.
    BTW, deer browse it here.
     
  9. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    Spray with gly and be done with it. I can roll in the stuff and never get it so I could care less.
    You can get a vaccine against it if you are highly susceptible. As said defense is best mechanism. Wash first with anti ivy soap before going out, and wash immediately coming back in. Obvious stuff to avoid, if it has 3 leaves leave it alone and take no chances. Pretty simple. Can be exposed by wind and burning and its contagious year round.
    And yes deer love it.
     
  10. Oakseeds

    Oakseeds Member

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    If you know you have been exposed to poison ivy, or oak, jump in the shower when you get home. Now, here is the key; borrow the plastic "fluffy" your wife likes to use to de-foliate and scrub your skin using dawn or ivory soap. The agent (from the plant) causing the skin irritation (rash) is an oil you pick up on your skin and/or clothes from the leaves or stalk(s) and a good scrubbing of your skin surface should remove most, if not all, of the oil. Just make sure you shower/scrub within 3-4 hours from exposure. Good luck!

    P.S. wash you work clothes (whatever you were wearing when exposed) before you wear them again
     
  11. Tap

    Tap Well-Known Member

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    Let me add this... After a day in the woods, your boot laces most likely have the oil (Urushiol) on them and that oil lasts a long time. A typical scenario... We come in from working, remove our clothes and wash or shower. We're usually good at that point, because we've scrubbed the oil off our skin. But a week later, with our bare hands, we put on those boots and tie them...we immediately transfer the Urushiol to our fingers and since we're going out to work, few of us wash our hands after we've tied our laces, and it will be hours before we wash our hands again. We may even contaminate the insides of our gloves. I'm convinced that is how a lot of us get that miserable rash between our fingers.
    We may wear gloves for working and think we are protecting our hands, and we are. But if you bare-handled your boots before going out to work, you've put poison ivy on your hands.
    Tools, tractor tires and implements, anything that comes in contact with Urushiol can transmit it to our bodies for months. Be careful what you touch.
    I've even gotten the rash on my ankles because I took off my boots and socks before I took my pants off, and didn't shower soon enough. My pant cuffs had Urushiol on them and rubbed against my ankles after I removed my socks.
    Ya gotta pay attention to anything that comes in contact with 3 leaves.
     
  12. sagittarius

    sagittarius Member

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    Crossbow ... a mix of Garlon4 and 2-4D, great on woody plants and weeds.
     
  13. John Barnes

    John Barnes Member

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    Planted some spruce last Tuesday, Thursday the rash started showing up. Never saw anything, but wasn't looking for it as I didn't know we had any. Not positive it is poison ivy, oak, or sumac, but don't know what else it would be. Guessing I touched a root in one of the holes.

    Didn't know about the power of Dawn. On the downhill side of it at this point, but I'll use it if there's a next time.
     
  14. swat1018

    swat1018 Active Member

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    Deer love poison ivy, they gobble it down.
     
  15. buckdeer1

    buckdeer1 Well-Known Member

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    they better start eating cause I am spraying this week
     
  16. Keith Nehrke

    Keith Nehrke Member

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    I second Tecnu. Great stuff. There's so much at our place that if I'm planting in wet soil, I will get it on my forearms every time, 70% of the time. Tecnu wash takes care of it before it's a problem.

    As for ivy, I only treat the large vines that are threatening trees. I use Triclopyr in basal oil and apply it to the cut stem at its base.
     
  17. Cap'n

    Cap'n Active Member

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    Anything with Triclopyr will do a good job on it. If it's in and around trees that you are worried will pick up the Triclopyr then use gly.
     

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