Persimmons...how do I love thee...let me count the ways.....

Discussion in 'Fruit Trees' started by Native Hunter, Sep 13, 2018.

  1. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Yes, those will be seedlings and will be a mixture of male and female.
     
  2. Deadeye

    Deadeye Well-Known Member

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    Got a Question for ya,

    My Lease Property is Full of Wild Persimmon Trees. But this weekend I spent two days walking it and only saw 1 Tree with Fruit.

    Is there something I can do to get the others to start producing Fruit as well?

    Or is this a Male-Female type of thing.

    I have considered putting some Fertilizer around the Drip Line, is there one you would suggest or should I try something else?
     
  3. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    It's likely a Male-Female type of thing. However, it could also be a late spring freeze keeping female trees from fruiting. That doesn't happen often because of how late persimmons flower, but it did happen in my area last year. We had almost no persimmon fruit, because of a freeze that came in early to mid May.

    Wild persimmon trees don't need fertilizer in order to produce. Look at the flowers next spring and see if they are male or female. That will tell you what you need to know. However, if you do want to fertilize a persimmon tree, it won't hurt it as long as you don't overdo it. I might add about 2 lbs of 13-13-13 per 1,000 square foot of crown. That would be okay if you can't stop yourself.
     
  4. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I found my first ripe persimmon for 2021 on the ground today. This is a tree I topworked to the cultivar "Miller," and it is making its first crop. Note how that even though ripe fruit is beginning to fall, there are many on the tree that are still very green. This is an indication of a persimmon tree with a very stretched out drop time, which is a good thing. You keep them coming for months.

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. Deadeye

    Deadeye Well-Known Member

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    I went back and read every post. I see now that I need to be there in Spring to check for Flower or not. Also probably open up some around a few of these trees.
     
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  6. Triple C

    Triple C Well-Known Member

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    Love this thread cause I love native persimmons. Checked my pear trees this past weekend and couldn't find but a handful of pears. Always hit n miss on my place. However, year after year after year...the good ol' native persimmons always seem to be loaded with fruit and require absolutely zero maintenance other thank keeping them daylighted.
     
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  7. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I agree TC. It's so easy, it's almost unfair.....:D
     
  8. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Another Note of Interest. A very small percentage of persimmons will have blue fruit rather than orange fruit. A neighbor of mine has a tree that makes blue persimmons, and I'm going over to look at it and take some pictures in a few days. I did note (as shown in the picture below) that a native tree on my farm bearing its first crop this year is currently showing fruit with a blue cast early on. I have no idea if these will be blue or orange once they ripen, but I will be watching it.

    [​IMG]
     

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