Persimmons...how do I love thee...let me count the ways.....

Discussion in 'Fruit Trees' started by Native Hunter, Sep 13, 2018.

  1. 144

    144 Active Member

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    I’m not Native, but that’s what I’ve started doing. When I find new persimmons, I flag them and go ahead and graft. Waiting to verify doesn’t make sense to me, when you can get earlier fruiting and the drop time/size you want by grafting specific cultivars.

    I had flowering on my second leaf on some grafts last year. I pinched them off since the branch wasn’t large enough yet. Hope to have a few persimmons this year on them.


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  2. David

    David Active Member

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    what is your go to grafting method and how large of a tree are you grafting onto?
     
  3. 144

    144 Active Member

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    Most native trees I have are under 2 inches in diameter, as they are root suckers off of old trees that were cut down years ago (I have a pine plantation). I normally use bark grafting, as it is easy and works best on larger rootstocks. If it is smaller, I use cleft grafts. Last year, I started using a method outlined on Red Fern Farms website called Mega-Chipbud Inlay grafting. It’s like a hybrid between bark grafting and chip budding. I have found I like it the best, as you get a lot of cambium contact (3 sides), and I can use a bud per graft, which means I can utilize all buds on a scion (=more chances to get it right).

    If I was just starting out, I’d start with bark grafting or cleft grafting. On bark grafting, just make sure you get good cambium contact and pull the cambium from the rootstock tight against the cambium of the scion (electrical tape used backwards works great). Provided it’s tight, you ought to have success.

    Here’s my thread when I started in 2017, shows some pictures and details of how I’ve done it. I’m no expert, but shows you that anyone can do it if they put the effort in. Costs almost nothing and is easy/fun to do.

    http://deerhunterforum.com/index.php?threads/persimmon-graft-results.2610/



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  4. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    David, I don't disagree with anything he said, but I would like to have a few females around that are from the gene pool of my local ecosystem and not grafted. It might not ever make any difference, but lets just say I have a feeling it is a good thing. Plus, every tree from seed is a new and unique creation, just like every human is. I like a little anticipation of what a new seedling could be. So, I think you weigh the options for your particular situation. I have done what he is doing on a few trees but not all trees.
     
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  5. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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  6. jteeen

    jteeen Active Member

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    I've planted about 75 persimmons from the state of Oklahoma. I have about 35 living about 15 are "all stars" that are getting some good growth after 4 years.

    I put almost all of them in 5' combitubes. I spray once or twice a year and let them be. Get them going and they are hardy. I think 5' may have hurt these tiny seedlings vs. 3' or 4'.

    I tried two grafted 3 gallon from chestnuthill and they died. No tubes and they didn't adjust to our random droughts.

    I bought 2 from native nurseries this year that i over wintered and am upsizing into 1 and 3 gallon rootmaker IIs.

    Ignoring the tubes all the trees above werent terribly expensive. We have several native orchards and a few giant trees but the cows eat them up. They dont get as big on our shallow soils. Persimmons are a great tree and I would recommend them to anyone starting out.

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