Persimmons...how do I love thee...let me count the ways.....

Discussion in 'Fruit Trees' started by Native Hunter, Sep 13, 2018.

  1. j-bird

    j-bird Well-Known Member

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    Are all your persimmon "native" trees or are they different varieties? I have seen some sold/offered that seem to be different varieties and the like and I am not so sure about those.....
     
  2. mattpatt

    mattpatt Active Member

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    There are also some that have different numbers of chromosomes (60 and 90). I do not believe they are compatible with each other.
     
  3. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    And in the deep south they have 30 chromosome persimmons. Much wrong information has been spread on this subject in the past....a lot like the FAKE NEWS of today.………;)

    I mentioned earlier in this thread that persimmons can set fruit parthenocarpically. No one seems to have noticed that or followed up on it.

    Example of this: a 90 C female persimmon set in a place where no 90 C males exist to pollinate them will still set fruit. BUT....the fruit will be seedless. So all of the persimmon pollination hype is of no importance to me.

    If I am wrong about this, then the University of KY College of Agriculture is also wrong, and I don't believe that they are wrong on this subject. See Link below:

    http://www.uky.edu/ccd/production/crop-resources/fruit/persimmons

    Happy fruiting!!!
     
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  4. mattpatt

    mattpatt Active Member

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    Well.. learn something new every day. I did notice the word parthnocarpically in your previous post but didn't know what it meant.
     
  5. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I have both (1) native trees and (2) some seedling trees that came from the NWTF fruiting now. Some of the topworking I have done is with named cultivars of American Persimmon. So, I have a broad mix of lots of genes.

    I even have one seedling that I believe to be a cross between an Asian and American. It shows characteristics of both and drops before anything else.

    Unlike some fruit trees - It's hard to go wrong with any persimmon that produces fruit. Thus....the love affair.
     
  6. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    There was an old commercial on television once about wearing seatbelts. It said, "You can learn a lot from a dummy." That's what just happened to you...……..:)
     
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  7. mattpatt

    mattpatt Active Member

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    TreeDaddy and SwampCat like this.
  8. mattpatt

    mattpatt Active Member

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    My biggest complaint about Asian varieties is that a lot of them (not all) but a lot of them hang on to the fruit and it will literally rot on the tree before falling off. I just always assumed this was a desirable trait for farming as you wouldn't necessarily want the fruit to fall if it were for human consumption.
     
  9. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I agree. I only have one Asian tree - just as a novelty.
     
  10. pinetag

    pinetag Active Member

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    Coons in persimmons you say? LOL.[​IMG][​IMG]

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
     
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  11. mattpatt

    mattpatt Active Member

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    That’s awesome. Lol.. I need to put a camera on my little grove of trees.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  12. lakngulf

    lakngulf Well-Known Member

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    Reply to several thoughts above
    1. Yes raccoons LOVE persimmons. But it has also been called deer candy
    2. raccoons do a better job of planting persimmons than any other method
    3. I agree with mattpatt that it seems my female to male ratio about 10% to 90%. deer population is the opposite
    4. Native used that big word to throw us off. He has his means of pollination, and I will just leave it there.
    5. Trees in my area are loaded, but all these would be the same variety. Always been a good place to hunt for opening day Bow season, October 15
    6. Yes they can be grown from seed and planted. This tree was once a seed in my greenhouse. Planted January 2013 and first persimmons this year. One thing I did notice was how big and healthy the fruit compared to other older trees.
    [​IMG]
     
  13. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    So.......this is what I know about persimmons. As a boy the ripe ones were very good to eat and it was damn funny to talk a city boy into biting into a green one.

    We had them everywhere then, but now you can't hardly find them. I've located a few trees that are loaded down and would like to know the process to grow seedlings if I get them in the next couple of weeks. I can think of several places that I would like to plant them.
     
  14. SwampCat

    SwampCat Well-Known Member

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    Made a trip around the place yesterday and somewhat kept up with the persimmon trees I saw. Fifty-seven with 3” dbh or larger - two with fruit - the rest with none. Coincidenty - the two with fruit are growing thirty feet apart.
     
  15. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Ask and you shall receive:

    https://homeguides.sfgate.com/grow-persimmons-seed-45681.html
     
  16. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Yesterday, I took a hedge trimmer attachment on a Stihl and cut down some NWSGs to about knee height along a fence row that I can see from my blind. I always see deer going into this area, but this is the first year I have taken the time to clean out where I can see into that spot. It didn't take but about 30 minutes, and I'm now able to see an 80 yard remote strip where deer travel.

    After cutting the grass I got to looking for a tree to make a mock scrape later on. Low and behold there was a persimmon tree that I had never seen before. The tree is about 4 inches DBH and 20 feet high. It was in horrible conditions - being shaded by a big sassafras on one side and a cedar on the other. It also was touching the cedar at the ground line, and had 3 pieces of barbed wire buried into it.

    I couldn't believe my eyes when I looked closer and saw fruit. It wasn't what I would call loaded, but the persimmons were the largest I had seen this year and were green as your lawn. The color tells me that this one will be a very late dropper.

    I clipped off the barbed wire on both sides. I had my saw in the truck to open up around the tree but decided to wait until next spring. I was worn out from other work that day and thought it would be a better spring job that could wait. My guess is that once this tree starts getting some sunlight, it will be a prolific producer.

    In this fence row that makes 4 persimmon trees I have found over the years, and 3 of them are females. If I count all of the native trees I have found on the whole place, I estimate between 50% and 75% are females. Of the ones I set as seedlings from the NWTF years ago, I can't tell all of them yet, but it looks like they will go over 50% too.
     
  17. mattpatt

    mattpatt Active Member

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Checked my persimmons today. They are getting close.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  18. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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  19. TreeDaddy

    TreeDaddy Active Member

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    Who sells named cultivars of american persimmons?

    thanks

    bill
     
  20. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Here are some I can think of:

    England's Orchard
    Nolin River Nut Tree Nursery
    Stark Brothers
    Wildlife Group now has a grafted American persimmon
    Chestnut Hills Outdoors
     
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