One Straw Farm

Discussion in 'Property Tours' started by Hoosierhunting, Jun 8, 2019.

  1. Baker

    Baker Well-Known Member

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    You are not going to like yellow nutsedge. Its hard and expensive to control with herbicides if you have much of it. Over time you can change your soil structure which may help other preferred plants take over.

    As an experiment in a 5 acre clover field that has a lot of sedge in it I planted a heavy dose of sunn hemp this summer. Just crimped it last week , added a ton of lime per acre and will plant in small grains and clover mid Sept. My 'hope' is the hemp crowded out the sedge along with the thatch from crimping and that the root structure from the hemp makes a difference.. I'll spray gly before planting. Strictly an experiment
     
  2. Hoosierhunting

    Hoosierhunting Active Member

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    I’ll be interested to hear your results Rusty. Have you noticed a difference between no-till and tillage with respect to its prevelance? Just wondering if tillage disrupted the underground tubers at all?


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  3. cutman

    cutman Administrator Staff Member

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    Yellow nutsedge is the worst. It is very similar to but not the same as chufa (which is what people plant for turkeys). Nothing eats it.

    You can control it with Permit in corn, basagran, heavy doses of roundup at the right time, and a disk. It loves wet soil.
     
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  4. Baker

    Baker Well-Known Member

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    The wet soil is the challenge I deal with. That is one reason I am trying to increase OM and change the soil structure hoping to get better percolation . This has been a wet year and sedge has flourished. For what it is worth I have always had sedge in my clover fields and have just learned to live with it. Too much to go the herbicide route because of cost. Clover can still do well with the sedge assuming its not too thick..

    Another thing I have to watch out for is mowing a field that may have sedge then moving to another filed as the seeds can get on the bush hog and travel creating problems in new fields.
     
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  5. OkieKubota

    OkieKubota Moderator Staff Member

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    Since I Brushhog commercially this is a problem for me as well. I try to hit the car wash as much as possible...
     
  6. Hoosierhunting

    Hoosierhunting Active Member

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    Sheesh, I thought at least the turkeys will be happy but that sounds about right for me....something that is an expensive pain in the ass to get rid of and nothing eats it. Thanks for clarifying that it’s not the same as chufa.


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  7. swat1018

    swat1018 Well-Known Member

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    Any had luck spraying clover with sedge in it with Imox? I just tried, mainly trying to get smart weed, but it's labeled for the sedge.
     
  8. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    Imox I sprayed in June took care of my Sedges. I wasn't chasing them, but just an added benefit.
    I'm like Baker, plant management is more productive than chemicals in the long run. First thing I do is sit and ask why does a plant like this spot. Usually it involves our soil management from its manipulations to plantings to choice of chemicals , fertilizers, soil makeup and nutrients, and moisture control in monsoon and/or drought conditions. Answer those questions, and then a plan is more productive and less expensive and work and often eliminates or reduces the need for chemicals.
     
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  9. Hoosierhunting

    Hoosierhunting Active Member

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    IMG_0051.JPG IMG_0053.JPG IMG_0054.JPG IMG_0055.JPG

    Put down some dwarf Essex rape and purple top turnips today in the hidden plot. It’s a little 3 acre plot that I’d let go fallow for the last several years. I was planning to plant the whole thing for a late season plot but couldn’t bring myself to do it. I don’t have a lot of early successional habitat like this. Have some in the works but this was four years in. So I put some strips in and left as much of the Forbes and milkweed alone as I could.....I do love a Monarch.


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