Nufarm Rhomene MCPA

Discussion in 'Herbicide Info' started by Double L, Jul 10, 2018.

  1. Double L

    Double L Active Member

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    Location:
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    Has any one used this befor? My papers got wet so it’s none readable I purchased it at local grow mark and they are about worthless when it comes to advise. I just mowed my clover/oats plots to be ready to plant my brassicas mix and some of the plots have some bad weeds in them. I was hoping to use this for them. Any help would be appreciated. [​IMG]


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  2. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    Will kill or at least set back your clovers depending if that is a problem for you. I've read some have used it instead of 2,4 Db which is safe on clovers and they had ok success. I've not done so.
     
  3. X-farmerdan

    X-farmerdan Active Member

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    I guess I don't understand its use, standalone, in ag crops unless there are broadleaf weeds it controls better than some of the other broadleaf herbicides. MCPA or its cousin, MCPP are most often mixed with 2,4-d and dicambia. The mixtures control and kill broadleaf weeds in combination better than each herbicide alone. I see those sorts of combinations used mostly post emergent on turf or in small grains. I looked at a few labels and all had the MCPA tank mixed with some other herbicide determined by the crop and the weeds needing controlled. It does persist in he soil and the half life is dependent on the soil organic matter content. Even so, and this is just my opinion, after 15 - 18 days most of it's effect is minimized. Again, just my opinion, I think you'd be better off using your MCPP in combination with something else. See above....

    From Wikipedia
    Commercial use[edit]

    MCPA is used as an herbicide, generally as its salt or esterified forms. Used thus, it controls broadleaf weeds, including thistle and dock, in cereal crops and pasture. It is selective for plants with broad leaves, and this includes most deciduous trees. Clovers are tolerant at moderate application levels. It is currently classified as a restricted use pesticide in the United States. Its toxicity and biodegradation are topics of current research. One formulation is described by its manufacturer as "designed for specific markets that require the safest possible phenoxy product, primarily for use in the Pacific Northwest".[5] Though not extremely toxic,[6] it has recently been determined that MCPA can form complexes with metal ions and thereby increase their bioavailability,[7] though there is also work being done to utilize this ability.[8]
     
  4. Double L

    Double L Active Member

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    Location:
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    thanks for the info, This is what i get for only spending a few $1000 at local grow mark and ask what to use to help with weeds in clover field this is what I get... I bought two $200 bag of grass killer for at work used it didnt see any thing die. I called to ask about application and they said too busy just read the book. I think they are about as usefull as teets on a boarhog
     

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