Medium red

Discussion in 'Food Plots for Wildlife' started by Drycreek, Mar 2, 2019.

  1. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    I didn't want to hijack the red and white clover thread so here's my situation. Last fall I planted medium red clover in a wheat plot. I was there yesterday getting a soil test sample and I have lots of clover in that plot. Right now, the deer (and hogs) have it mowed like a golf course, but soon the wheat will take off as they quit using it so much, in fact I can tell that it's getting a little taller now.

    So here's my question. In, let's say, a month, do I just need to hit the wheat with cleth and kill it ? That should let the clover really flourish don't you think ? This is my maiden voyage with any annual clover and my intention is to reduce the "bare dirt" periods from two times a year to once. I can't throw and mow because of the hogs, but planting medium red or some other annual clover in the fall with my grain crop would at least keep something green in front of them from late September or early October until however long the clover can stand this ETexas heat, (and that remains to be seen). Any and all suggestions are welcome.

    This is the plot just a few days ago. image.jpeg
     
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  2. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    I just let my rye or wheat self terminate in the summer which is June for me, earlier for you. You can then mow it if you want, I don't, or leave it and do a rotation planting into the standing dead grain and active clover for a fall plot, with mowing or crimping grain on to new seed.. Some do choose to spray Cleth and terminate grains early. I'm just kinda lazy. Yours sure looks good regardless, more snow for me tomorrow .
     
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  3. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    No need to kill the grains. The medium red should just start taking over without anything. Plots below did not have grains terminated.

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  4. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    Looking at a nice stand of deer clover like yours does something for me, like some guys looking at a nice sports car.
     
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  5. suburbhunter

    suburbhunter Member

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    I planted awnless wheat and a few varieties of red and white clover last fall as well on 2ac. My thought is to let the wheat produce seed heads which will also feed the deer. Then mow the stalks but after looking at Natives pics, I guess I'll see I'll if the clover takes over.
     
  6. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    Native, that sounds like a plan to me except that I don't want to attract hogs with seed heads. Less work suits me as I have plenty to do in the spring season. I'll just see how it works out. Thanks guys...
     
  7. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    Thats pretty nice but where do you get the seed to grow those rifles?? Pretty cool. They must thrive off the N the clover around them is producing for such fine stainless.
     
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  8. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    It's the next best thing to money that grows on trees......;)
     
  9. dogdoc

    dogdoc Moderator Staff Member

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    left grains also make some great fawning habitat also. NH--your clover field is a beautiful site.
    todd
     
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  10. SwampCat

    SwampCat Well-Known Member

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    Left grains at my place attract hogs. They come in and eat the heads off the wheat after they ripen. Doesnt seem to affect the clover.
     
  11. Doe Shooter

    Doe Shooter Active Member

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    What he said
     
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  12. SwampCat

    SwampCat Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunately, the taller wheat provides excellent fawning and nesting cover at the same time it goes to seed. The does and turkeys find the mixed clover/wheat ideal for fawning and nesting, and the wheat seed heads are beckoning all the coons and hogs to come to the same food plot.
     
  13. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    That's kinda what I'm afraid of too. Everything grain that I've ever planted attracted hogs when seed heads ripened. We already have plenty, so I'm thinking I'll go ahead and leave the wheat and see what happens. A couple sessions with the NV scope and the 6.8 will discourage them.
     
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  14. Chainsaw

    Chainsaw Well-Known Member

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    For us the grains do not seed out until ?/?July or later. I credit part of the higher than normal recruitment rate here with leaving the grains to grow to maturity. That of course is based on the assumption that the critters will hunt fawns where the grasses are shorter than ours and the fawns are easier to find.

    This is just another example where what works or doesn't work in one property can not be taken as a paradigm for all.
     
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