Looking at extended forecast

Discussion in 'Food Plots for Wildlife' started by jlane35, Jul 25, 2020.

  1. jlane35

    jlane35 Active Member

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    ****Another I need your opinion question****

    I know a lot have suggested planting brassicas in late July. And the bag suggests August 1st. So there isn’t much of a difference there. But what I’m seeing is a lack of rain coming. Am I wrong for thinking I’m better off getting the seed on the ground and packed in and take advantage of the sporadic rains, if any materialize? Or should I wait until I see a higher probability on multiple days to get the seed in the dirt?
    4AF727B5-0D9D-4720-804E-9BECA1E9EE3A.png
     
  2. TheOldOak

    TheOldOak Active Member

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    Plant it. The brassica seed will sit in the dirt until the rains come, and you have a decent chance of rain in the next week. Living on your property does make planting just before a rain more feasible. Also, larger seeds like wheat, oats, sunflower, soybean, etc. I would want to wait. When I broadcast them, the turkeys think the buffet line was opened just for them and they will have their own "field days"!

    I've found best success when the plot receives a heavy rain after the seed has germinated and has started growing. Hurricanes that bring heavy rain all the way up to Indiana have produced some of my best plots ever. Nothing like a slow 2-3 inch rain to really make it pop.
     
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  3. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    I try to plant w rain but that’s not always feasible. If good thatch layer the seed will stay protected and kept moist w minimal showers. I hate bare dirt exposed for very long if one does tillage. We are in another drought period like last year so my brassica planting may Just be a a late season grain/oats planting. Flexibility is good. Good luck.


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  4. jlane35

    jlane35 Active Member

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    I know what your saying and I see the benefit of the thatch. I currently have an acre of brassicas surviving our dry heat because of it. Unfortunately, this part of the field is where a gas line cuts across our field, and last fall happened to be their mowing/spraying rotation. So it didn’t leave much thatch for me. I’m sure I could get my hands on more oats or winter rye incase this fails.

    I’m so glad you guys opened my eyes to winter rye! It seems like it’s going to be my fail safe of fall plantings.
     
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  5. Elkaddict

    Elkaddict Well-Known Member

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    I don’t know about your area, but we have really heavy dews which help germination and keep young plants viable until rains come. I’d get the seed on the ground ASAP.
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2020
  6. jlane35

    jlane35 Active Member

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    That was a thought of mine, but I wasn’t sure if it was a silly thought or not. We have very heavy dew this time of the year. I just got back from running my beagles and when they come out of the brush they looked like drowned rats.
     
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  7. cutman

    cutman Administrator Staff Member

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    The worst thing that can happen is you get enough moisture to germinate the seed but not enough to sustain new seedlings. I would wait until you have reliable moisture.
     
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  8. TreeDaddy

    TreeDaddy Well-Known Member

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    I get excited when all of the northern fellas start planting and fight to NOT jump the gun

    Best results for me when plant late september/early october

    bill
     
  9. BoneCrusher20

    BoneCrusher20 Active Member

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    Hardiness Zone:
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    I would say like TreeDaddy you are jumping the gun...you obviously are south of me as my forecast this week was mid 70s and i'm not even thinking about planting yet....still 2-3 weeks away for most of my plots....brassicas are just like my lettuce in garden or cool season grass, It wants those fall 60-70 degree days not 80s that is when it thrives for growth. Also, most brassicas mature after 6-10 weeks & become extremely sought after when first frost hits for me that's mid-sept guessing you are little later. 10 weeks from today hardly gets you into October and no longer as palatable to deer, so unless you are bug fighter in september i would be sitting tight and if you need diesel therapy go mow some trails and wait for rain!
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2020
  10. Elkaddict

    Elkaddict Well-Known Member

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    It really depends on what you are planting and where you are. I try to plant Winfred/Rutabagas the third week of June. The are still growing come late September when we get our first frost. I think the third week of July is right for Radishes, Turnips or DER. This is what Winfred/Rutabagas look like when planted late June. They will be completely devoured before the end of March. ACC47935-DEAB-4F04-BA62-5F83CA7243E4.jpeg
     
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  11. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    Got it done today. Been watching for the weather to break last 3 wks. Had already mowed last years WW and thatch was great. Kept it simple mix this year kinda old school, with PTT, DER , Forage Radish. Urea, 19-19-19. Good rains as finished broadcasting seed. Still raining 6 hours later. Better to be lucky than good. I'll overseed RC and either WW or WR late Oct. Then sleep till next fall for next planting.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2020
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  12. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Pennsylvania plus Deer= Winter Rye.
     
  13. THE LLC

    THE LLC Well-Known Member

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    Worst thing that can happen this time of year is to plant then get a little rain sporadically. Stuff will germinate then dry weather kills it. Don’t ask me how I know.
     

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