Is this an ash?

Discussion in 'Name This Plant' started by T-Max, Sep 29, 2018.

  1. T-Max

    T-Max Well-Known Member

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    This tree is in my mother’s neighbor’s yard. Really a pretty tree. I think it is an ash, but I want to be sure because I think I’m gonna put one in my yard.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


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  2. Tap

    Tap Well-Known Member

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    Sure looks like it.
    Are you aware of the Emerald Ash Borer? In many areas mature ash are being wiped out by the millions. Immature trees don't get attacked as much. Around here, the die off of mature trees is just about 100%. I'm not sure I would plant one with hopes of it surviving into middle age.

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  3. T-Max

    T-Max Well-Known Member

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    I have heard of them. Wasn’t aware of the severity. Dang. It is a great looking tree!


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  4. swat1018

    swat1018 Active Member

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    Enjoy it while you can. Borer hit her about 6-7 years ago. All of the ash are pretty much dead now.
     
  5. Tap

    Tap Well-Known Member

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    I have heard there are some preventative measures to protect individual trees. I think you inject pesticide into the tree?? That's ok for a couple yard trees, but not much can be done for the majority growing wild.
    Never realized how many ash were around here until you see them all dead and still standing. It takes a few years before an entire tree is on the ground. In the meanwhile, they continuously shed dead branches. Cleaning up after them along access roads is a constant battle.
    And to boot, our region is overrun with Japanese Stilt Grass which completely engulfs all the downed branches and trees. Its really treacherous trying to walk in the woods...very easy to twist a knee or ankle, or fall. I'm not exaggerating how bad it is. Its really sad to see what has happened to our woods in the last 6 years.

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  6. Flo1919

    Flo1919 New Member

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    Location:
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    I have an apocalypse on my hands here in Western NY. I own 56 acres of woods, 70% ash. Getting cut this winter. Very sad. Glad I’ve been diversifying oak and chestnut seedlingsover the past 10 years. Really heartbreaking though.
     
  7. Tap

    Tap Well-Known Member

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    I feel your pain. IMO, habitat managers need to keep a close eye on the ash trees in their area. When the 1st hint of EAB shows up, start cutting your mature ash trees before they die. Doing so will cut them while they still have some market value, and it will make it safer to cut them. Dead ash branches are quite fragile, literally hanging by a thread. The slightest disturbance can make a deadly widow maker fall. Spend any amount of time in woods with dead ash and the sounds of stuff crashing to the ground happens regularly.

    Another reason to cut them while they are still alive is because the roots are still alive and will stump sprout creating browse and cover. Once the tree top has died, the roots are dead, too. At that point, the entire tree is basically useless except for fire wood.

    Something I've wondered about with this EAB situation...There's millions of board feet rotting on the ground...perfect scenario for termite infestation. Years from now, will we be looking at an explosion in the termite population and if so, where will they go after the millions of ash are totally decayed? Will they turn their attention on our homes and buildings?
     
  8. j-bird

    j-bird Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Decatur county, IN Zone 6a
    I agree that it looks to be an ash.....not sure which one right off the top of my head. Yes the ash borer is something to consider. The affects of it can be regional and the growth stage of the tree has some influence on it's impact as well. That tree you show will produce long narrow "winged" seed like maples do. On my place ash grows pretty easily.
     

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