I must be honest.

Discussion in 'Deer Hunting' started by Doe Shooter, Nov 22, 2022.

  1. Doe Shooter

    Doe Shooter Active Member

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    I must be honest. This last weekend a family member took a very large buck. We skinned and boned out few other deer which were young and the big boy. I've been doing this for over 45 years. And I must confess that I never had any older large racked buck meat that I consider good enough to eat. I know that smell. I've tried many recipes, but nope,won't bother to again. That said we have dogs that we need to feed. And I package and freeze big buck meat for them. I am content that I am not wasting any meat. Anybody else feel this way?
     
  2. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    Nope. The buck I killed last year was rutted up big time, black, greasy hocks and stank like it. We soak the meat in milk for a half hour or so before cooking and it’s as good as any. YMMV
     
  3. g squared 23

    g squared 23 Well-Known Member

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    Wet aging it in the fridge for a week or two before you cook it up helps a lot. You’ll never eat a beef steak that hasn’t been aged, so treat your venison the same. The fawns and younger does don’t need to be aged, the older deer do.


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  4. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

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    I’ve been Corning roasts from a 5 year old buck I shot last November. This process tames the meat significantly. If you like Rueben’s or hash it’s a good option. We only eat venison so my wife always finds a low and slow spicy Indian or Mexican dish that works great.


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  5. George

    George Well-Known Member

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    Totally disagree.

    G
     
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  6. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    I've eaten venison all my life, and have never tasted much of a difference. There's a much bigger difference in how the meat was cared for after the kill; a big old rutting buck that is skinned properly, and all the white fat trimmed off, and in the fridge within an hour after shooting it is better than a yearling that lay around for a day in warm weather and is butchered sloppily.
    I have friends who compete nationally in steak cookoff's and their favorite saying is that the quality of the cut of meat is much more important for great tasting flavor than how it's cooked in the end. IMO the same holds true for deer meat, and a lot of it is in the processing. Beef is skinned within minutes of killing and in the cooler within an hour after slaughtering. The butchers that I know age their beef at 33-34 degrees. I know people who age their venison at 50 degrees, and it tastes spoiled.
     
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  7. massey

    massey Well-Known Member

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    Butcher yourself, trim well, cool as fast as possible, vacuum seal, pull out of freezer 10 days before eating and leave in fridge. That smell can get to you, but don’t let it keep you from eating them. Proper prep is all that matters, as stated above.


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  8. readonly

    readonly Active Member

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    You must cut the tarsal and then use the same knife to cut the meat. No other explanation. And a waste.
     
  9. Deadeye

    Deadeye Well-Known Member

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    Grew Up eating Deer Meat. My Mother always said the Doe Meat tasted better than any Buck ever would.

    Dad liked to let them hang on the bottom Porch for 4-5 Days but it was usually cold enough to do that. Cutting them up was easier when they were almost frozen as well.

    Living where I live now I use a Large Cooler. Put Wood Blocks in the bottom. Place the Quarters and Cut Meat into Thick Black Bags and place on top. Fill with Ice.

    Pull the Drain Plug and set the Cooler on a Angle. Lets the water drain out as the Ice Melts.

    Let set for 5-7 Days. Cut up and enjoy.

    I read one time that the Rigermortise (?) that locks up the meat after death takes 6-7 days to leave the body. Makes sense that the Meat is more tender once aged to let it leave before cutting up
     
  10. KSQ2

    KSQ2 Well-Known Member

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    We process all our own deer, I too can tell a difference when it comes to a really old buck. In that case, everything possible goes to jerky meat.
     
  11. OkieKubota

    OkieKubota Moderator Staff Member

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    I can’t tell the difference between a 6.5 year old buck or a yearling doe...all taste absolutely great!
     
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  12. George

    George Well-Known Member

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    I have found mature buck meat to be more tender than doe meat. I used to eat slices of buck meat in Iowa raw. In Colorado I had whitetail, mule deer, and elk for side by side comparison and all were equally, very good. It bewilders me that someone would process the healthiest, best eating meat in the world for dog food. To each their own, I guess. There is a learning curve to presenting the best venison.

    G
     
  13. T-Max

    T-Max Well-Known Member

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    I think one’s opinion of best use can vary greatly, but at the end of the day if you are using the animal to support your lifestyle it shouldn’t be considered a waste. Feeding your dogs venison is healthier for them and saves you the cost of commercial dog food. I myself would much rather eat any old buck if it is handled properly, but understand and respect your right to utilize the animal as you see fit. That being said, if I were you I would look at my handling methods to see if they can be improved because as others have said, big ole bucks are delicious!


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  14. Doe Shooter

    Doe Shooter Active Member

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    Thanks for everyone responding. This was a 5 year old. Taken at last light. Promptly field dressed and hung. It was 16 degrees over night. I have kept the meat separate from the other deer and will try some backstrap later. We'll see. I have processed well over a hundred of my own as well as family's harvests.
     
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  15. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I just ate some chili made out of a gnarly old 6 year old buck, and it was delicious.
     
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