Handgun Hunting Rounds in .44?

Discussion in 'Deer Hunting' started by randomguy, Nov 28, 2019.

  1. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    Didn’t yer mama teach you not to hang out in them places pilgrim ? Ain’t no telling what you might come home with.......
     
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  2. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    EF4C8F59-F579-4F36-9A13-8B7251E1A2CF.jpeg See what I mean ? :)
     
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  3. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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  4. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    Well you guys have to put it in perspective. There are handloaders on here that can explain it better, but..... Power Factor....PF=bullet weight in grains X velocity in FPS/1000. You are assuming that each bullet is traveling at the same speed which is unlikely. The heavier bullet is traveling at a slower speed, thus giving less felt recoil.
    You are correct of Newtons law but applying here, it is the explosion of powder that is causing the horizontal and vertical recoil especially in pistol. The lighter bullet is typically using more powder which means more gas and weight exploding from barrel tip, i.e., bullet + gas. In addition the lighter bullet spends less time in the barrel, creating more recoil effect.
    This is considering most things are equal and in competition shooting there are ways to get around the affects.
    But I stand by my statement, a much heavier bullet produces less felt recoil. May not notice as much with a 44, but trust me change weights in a 454 and you will see. Hence a 500 actually seems to have less felt recoil than a 454.
     
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  5. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Your are rightfully saying that less is actually more. or that if someone doesn't like felt recoil stick to archery shooting.
     
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  6. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    Would that suggestion apply to a trad, compound or cross bow? Just stirring the pot of course and kidding. Merry Christmas to all and hope there are boxes of ammo/arrows under the tree.
     
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  7. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    I would call them semi-custom, but I really can’t prove that as I bought them from a guy on the Ruger Forum. They’re mesquite wood.


    dogghr, while I have no doubt that sometimes what you say can be true, generally speaking, when you start a heavier bullet out of the bore, you’re gonna get more of that “equal and opposite reaction”.

    Think about it, longer time in the barrel equals more recoil, not less. This is not a perfect analogy, but starting your pickup onto the road with an empty bed vs starting off with a bed full of rocks. You’re gonna have to gas it with the rocks, like a heavy bullet, not so much empty, as with a lighter bullet. I’ve spent lots of powder and lead behind a .45 Colt and a .44 Magnum. You can use cowboy loads in the Colt or .44 Special loads in the magnum to mitigate recoil one way or you can load lighter bullets in the heavier loads to do the same thing. Try a Ruger only load with a 300 grain bullet in a revolver chambered in .45 Colt, then try a Ruger only load with a 250 grain bullet and you can tell easily that this is true. The thing is, you almost have to use max loads of each to tell the difference, hence my statement “generally speaking”.
     
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  8. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    ^^^^^^ Negatory. You are thinking inside the box. Let your mind drift free. The recoil is a factor mostly of the explosion of gas and mass as they are released out end of barrel. And the speed and amount of those inputs. Think how a muzzle brake or silencer functions.
    Really not that important. Shoot what you are comfortable with. Great shooters become good with a 22 and those same habits and techniques transfer to the actual weapon to be used. No need spend hours or dollars with heavy recoil/expensive ammo.


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  9. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    It's Christmas and not the season to start an argument, here's to hoping for a good and relaxing Holiday for you fine folks down in Texas. But like you said, the longer time in the barrel thing wasn't the best analogy. A faster bullet of the same weight will have more recoil than a slower bullet of the same weight, think 150 grain 30-30 vs. 150 grain 30-06, which quickly proves this theory, the 30-30 bullets being in the barrel longer with less recoil. When my 44 is loaded the bullets are in the barrel all day if there's no trophy bucks running, which is most days, and there's no recoil at all. Just being facetious :)
     
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  10. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    All due respect , 30-30 to 30-06 is apples to oranges. The only way to truly compare is different loads in the same caliber/ gun, just heavier bullets. Lighter bullets often shoot lower with the same zero because......they spend less time in the barrel and the gun doesn’t recoil upward as much while the bullet is still in there. All this is dependent on the same gun, same caliber, just different loads.

    Ain’t gonna be any argument though, I bought my first handgun at 16 years old, been shooting them all my life, and still own more than anyone has a need for. So....we’ll agree to disagree. :)
     
  11. randomguy

    randomguy Member

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    So I went and shot today. It didn’t go too badly. I can tell you that you can feel the difference between a 270 grain Speer and a 240 grain Magtech cheapo.

    I shot off a shooting stick and I’m flinching pretty good but I still made a lot of decent shots. I adjusted my red dot a bit and that seemed to help. As I was packing up and I picked up the pistol, I felt something wiggle. Upon further investigation, the rail screws loosened. So that was kinda frustrating. Now I have to take the optic off to get those secured, mount it back on, re-zero. I need the practice, yeah. But now I’m questioning both the good shots AND the bad ones!


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  12. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    You may already know, but clean the mount screw holes and the screws with alcohol and use some blue Loctite on the screw threads. That will keep the mount tight.
     
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  13. randomguy

    randomguy Member

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    I was thinking about that.... I'm actually in manufacturing. For some reason, I was thinking that Loctitie #242 (blue) was not suited for stainless steel. But I just looked it up and their site specifically mentions stainless.... So yeah, I guess I'll do that. Thanks for the suggestion!
     
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  14. DocHolladay

    DocHolladay Well-Known Member

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    I took a few classes by optic companies at my last job. Most recommended 30in.lb. for the base screws and 25in.lb for the rings. 25inlb is an Allen wrench starting to bend if you don’t have a inch pound torque wrench or go hand tight and then give it a little more(not much) if using a screw driver. I also blue loctited everything.


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  15. randomguy

    randomguy Member

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    Well, I took it all apart and cleaned it. The holes are too small for any of the brushes that I’ve got, so just ran a patch through them with some alcohol on it and pushed it through with a small nail. I found that one of the tapped holes appears to have either been tapped crooked, or was cross threaded during assembly at some point. So a previous owner over drilled one of the clearance holes in the rail to accommodate the screw being a little off kilter. I was concerned at first, but when I assembled it dry, it seemed to hold torque OK. So I reassembled with a little blue 242 loctite.

    Put him back in the safe to let it all set. I’ll put the optic back on tomorrow and take it back out to shoot in a couple weekends. Going out tomorrow night to hopefully get my son a doe with his crossbow, then we’re out of town for a week.


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  16. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    My money is on the good holes and the loctite holding for you. Good luck with it, and good luck on your hunt.
     

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