Fertilizer question

Discussion in 'Food Plots for Wildlife' started by Cedar Ridge, Nov 8, 2018 at 1:07 PM.

  1. Cedar Ridge

    Cedar Ridge Active Member

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    Location:
    South Central KY
    My plots (winter wheat, oats, and winter peas) were all planted Labor Day weekend and have done great with all the rains we’ve had since then. They are beginning to look slightly on the yellow side so I’m guessing they could use a dose of nitrogen. Thoughts from any of you on what a good, overall option might be? If it helps any, I’ve got 7 fields that comprise roughly 7 acres total. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. X-farmerdan

    X-farmerdan Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Richmond, Virginia, USDA Zone 7b
    Yellowing can be a sign of many symptoms. Too much water? Freeze? Doing what they are supposed to do when day length gets short? If it is nitrogen and you fertilizer and that pushes new growth (unlikely and inefficient) a freeze will damage all that new, young tender growth and set you back more than you gained. I wouldn't do it, not even in south central Kentucky.
     
  3. Cedar Ridge

    Cedar Ridge Active Member

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    Location:
    South Central KY
    Thanks for the reply. It’s been showing a little yellowing the last couple of weeks and we haven’t really had any cold weather to speak of so I don’t think it frost related. I have been wondering about too much water because we’ve had a TON of rain the last two months. I’ve got plenty of forage so I haven’t been worried as much about adding new growth as I was maybe the yellowing affecting the taste / palatability. Relatively new to plotting so trying to make sure I do (or don’t do) things I need to.
     
  4. Cap'n

    Cap'n Active Member

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    Location:
    Okla. City
    If you look at the wheat & rye crops in the area you can probably see some yellowing on the back side of a terrace that is holding water. The wet soil is smothering the crop. Lack of oxygen in the soil. Not much you can do about it except wait until the ground drys up.
     
  5. Foragefarmer

    Foragefarmer Member

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    Location:
    Central, Va.
    Hardiness Zone:
    7
    My brassica plot is on a modest incline down to a creek and the brassicas are lush and tall at the top but are stunted at the bottom where they have basically grown in standing water. Usually it is the other way around due to lack of rain. We hit our average yearly rainfall mark back in Aug.. It hasn't let up since.
     

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