East Central Ohio shrub (pink red)

Discussion in 'Name This Plant' started by Tap, Nov 5, 2019.

  1. Tap

    Tap Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    What is this?
    This turns beautiful red this time of year (its not burning bush).
    It has liner ridges along the stems. This patch of these shrubs has none much over 8 foot.[​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

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  2. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    Tap, I believe that is Burning Bush that has gone wild. Do some research and you will find that it has the linear ridges on the stems just like your shrub. Those ridges are a defining feature of that shrub, and there is nothing else like it that develops the red fall color. Burning Bush has become very invasive in a lot of areas. Deer won't eat it BTW, so it spreads easily in woodland from lack of browsing.
     
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  3. Tap

    Tap Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    Are there different varieties of it? Most of the burning bush Ive seen is deep red, not pink like the ones in my pics.
    And years ago, I planted one in my yard (and I didn't cage it). Deer hammered it like crazy, but it withstood the heavy browsing and would resprout each year. Eventually, after several years, it was running out of steam and it died. My deer certainly browsed BB.

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  4. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Check out the link below. It has pictures and all the info.

    https://www.invasiveplantatlas.org/subject.html?sub=3023
     
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  5. Tap

    Tap Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. Will do.
    I was looking at one site that said they have fall fruit and hold capsules well into the winter...I didn't notice anything like that.


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  6. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Like lots of other plants, the amount of sunlight and other environmental factors during the growing season can have a lot to do with seed production. I'm pretty certain that's it.
     
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  7. Tap

    Tap Well-Known Member

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    As usual, Native nails it again. Amazing.
    I assume we are just past the fruit stage, that's why I didn't see any.
    I am still a little puzzle why this stuff is not as deep red as all the "domestic" stuff I see growing in yards.

    Thanks brother!
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  8. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Glad to help.

    PS: The reason for the color difference is the lack of sunlight in a wooded setting. Without at least 6 hours of sunlight, they will not be deep red. You will see the same thing in landscape settings if you watch around houses. The deepest red ones will be out away from trees.
     
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  9. sagittarius

    sagittarius Member

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    Location:
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    Deer browse on my burning bushes in the winter, even up against the house, but leave them alone the rest of the year. Rabbits hit them hard some winters when the bunny populations are up. Up here never found Burning bush to be invasive at all, or barberry for that matter.
     
  10. j-bird

    j-bird Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    I think it's burning bush as well. Other bright red shrub is eastern wahoo.....but it's bark is very different and tends to grow as a multi-stemmed shrub in colonies and not from a single base. It has a very distinctive seed as well. It also like more direct sunlight as I see it in fence rows and only at the edges of timber where it can get more sunlight.
     
  11. massey

    massey Active Member

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    The other plant that looks similar is winged sumac. Might look that one up.


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