Durana

Discussion in 'Food Plots for Wildlife' started by Creek chub, Feb 26, 2019.

  1. Creek chub

    Creek chub Active Member

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    I frost seeded some Durana about 2 weeks ago. Under ideal conditions, when should I notice any germination this time of year?
     
  2. pinetag

    pinetag Well-Known Member

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    I'm curious to know as well as I just seeded some ladino and I would think they would be fairly comparable.

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  3. Creek chub

    Creek chub Active Member

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    From what I’ve read, Durana is a slow starter. I planted some last fall. It germinated but nothing impressive. I believe the first growing season it focuses on root development then the above ground growth explodes, hopefully
     
  4. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Clover starts much better with a nurse crop than trying to seed it alone. Buckwheat and oats are good choices for spring seeding, wheat and rye work well for fall seeding. Fall seeded rye with a frost seeding of clover in early spring is a great combination. The clover should germinate in several weeks. It takes much longer for seed to germinate in cool weather. We are still several weeks off for frost seeding clover in zone 6b.
     
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  5. OkieKubota

    OkieKubota Moderator Staff Member

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    I have planted a lot of Durana clover and it is slow to start but persistent once established. It outcompeted all of my medium red clover I planted with it...
     
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  6. pinetag

    pinetag Well-Known Member

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    Good deal. I put down oat seeds with mine this past weekend.
    [​IMG]

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  7. Prelude8626

    Prelude8626 Member

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    I wish I could even see the ground. Still lots of snow up here in Maine!
     
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  8. Creek chub

    Creek chub Active Member

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    That’s impressive. The areas I planted Durana are being converted back to cattle pasture. One plot is all red clover but I’d like a true perennial clover and like the idea of Durana taking over that plot
     
  9. Creek chub

    Creek chub Active Member

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    I frost seeded Durana into last fall’s winter rye in two plots and into one red clover plot. Do think that’s ok?
     
  10. coolbrze0

    coolbrze0 Member

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    This is 100% correct. But not sure to the OPs question if it should be germinating yet.
     
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  11. FarmerD

    FarmerD Active Member

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    Your Durana germination will begin when soil temperatures are in the high 50's/low 60's and there is adequate moisture.
     
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  12. FarmerD

    FarmerD Active Member

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    I think that will be fine, however, if you had a high seeding rate on the cereal rye, I would terminate the rye, once it gets 10" tall this spring. If you seeded the cereal rye at 50 lbs per acre, you'll probably be ok. At 120 lbs/acre and it will shade out the clover, enough, to not give you a good stand.

    How many pounds per acre of clover did you seed?
     
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  13. Creek chub

    Creek chub Active Member

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    According to my notes it looks like I seeded 50# on a half acre plot.

    Can I bush hog the rye and kill it?
     
  14. FarmerD

    FarmerD Active Member

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    Um, 50 pounds on 1/2 acre? That probably equates to around 25 pounds per 1/2 acre of actual pure live seed (PLS) or 50 pounds per acre of PLS. You went a little high ..... :)

    upload_2019-2-27_8-28-28.png

    https://www.pennington.com/all-products/wildlife/durana-clover

    Bush hogging won't kill the rye. It will just shorten it and then keep growing. The best thing to do, is spray it with clethodim and crop oil, when it starts to actively grow. It will kill the rye and not harm the clover and the extra clethodim won't go to waste, because you will use it take care of future grasses in your new plot.

    Keep an eye on it and post pictures in another 45 days and let's see what kind of stand you have with the clover, and we might change our minds on what to do. That's a lot of clover you put down! :)

    My Father always used to say, that the best fertilizer a farmer can apply ..... was his own shadow. Got to get out there an look and make decisions from there! :)
     
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  15. FarmerD

    FarmerD Active Member

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    Or am I mistaken and that was 50 lbs per 1/2 acre of cereal rye (my bad)?
     
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  16. Creek chub

    Creek chub Active Member

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    Ha. I meant 50# of winter rye but probably didn’t type too well. 50# of Durana would look like a seed carpet. lol
    Thanks for the advice
     
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  17. FarmerD

    FarmerD Active Member

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    No problem! Take some pics a little later in the spring.
     
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  18. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    I love a happy ending! Red clover can be a good nurse crop as well, and in a perfect world the Ladino outcompetes it...
     
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  19. Creek chub

    Creek chub Active Member

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    I’m a novice plotter but I really like red clover. It seems less picky about soil type and really grows quickly
     
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  20. Triple C

    Triple C Well-Known Member

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    I was down at the farm last weekend and wish I had taken a few pics of my ladino/durana plots. The look fantastic. At my latitude, I cannot think of a better source for near year round food than clover. And the more cost conscious I become the better I like clover. Gift that keeps on giving.
     

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