Dogghr's Theory of Random Clusters or Hinge Cutting Manipulation

Discussion in 'Native Habitat Management' started by dogghr, Jan 25, 2019.

  1. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    "Random-Cluster Model
    Let [​IMG] be a finite graph, let [​IMG] be the set [​IMG] whose members are vectors [​IMG], and let [​IMG] be the sigma-algebra of all subsets of [​IMG]. A random-cluster model on [​IMG] is the measure [​IMG] on the measurable space [​IMG] defined for each [​IMG] by

    [​IMG]


    In the above setting, the case [​IMG] corresponds to a model in which graph edges are open (i.e., [​IMG]) or closed (i.e., [​IMG]) independently of one another, a scenario which can be used as an alternative definition for the term percolation. For cases [​IMG], the random-cluster model models dependent percolation." ----Christopher Stover


    Several years ago while reading about some Nobel prize winner's theory of electron movement within matter, the analysis of them moving in Random Clusters was compared to cars traveling down a highway. They weren't all spaced out equally but as each of us have seen typically, were gathered in groups/clusters which are randomly scattered as one travels, hence giving us open road intermixed with times of heavy traffic.
    And so along this theory as I began hinge cutting areas of my farm, I gradually realized they were beginning to follow a random fashion allowing possible travel of deer groups , especially bucks. While the initial cuttings weren't planned as such, they developed into this pattern progressing from the bottom/low part of my farm, progression along the downwind side of my food plots, to the upper most ridges on the back of my property.
    For the most part, the deer, especially during the rut times, follow these hinge cut areas and the edges they create, hopping from each to the next, traversing the more mature, older, acorn producers of my forest. My goals, as they progressed was to mimic the precolonial hardwood forest that were made up of mature mast producers but inter mixed by thickets created by fire, disease, death, and storms.
    I seldom see bedding within the hinges, except for #1, but I do see bedding and definite movement of deer along their edges. Indeed they are place in typical areas of deer movement, in typical topography deer prefer,and on the prevailing downwind direction of my food plots.
    I have five Random Clusters following along the east side of my property and while they are separate pockets, over the years of additional hinging, they slowly are becoming more connected.
    Of the bucks I considered targets this past year, all of them presented themselves in some fashion in relationship of travel to the Random Clusters, with #2 and 5 being the most productive. My still hunting endeavors that I described on my land thread, all took place with close encounters along my Clusters and the buck and doe taken occurred within a Cluster.
    Hinges are made from ground level to shoulder height and larger trees simply fell cut. They aren't particularly thick, just a change in appearance of flora that attracts the deer. I tend to drop trees that are crowding my money maker acorn producers, unwanted shade tolerant trees such as maple, and opening the overstory to allow sunlight and less competition, which promotes better growth of the oaks, and browse growth of the brush.
    After hinging an area, I spread WW to attract my turkeys who churn up the ground promoting new growth of the now exposed soils. Fire, which was an important component of the old forests, would be a great choice but I choose not to use that option.
    While hinge cutting in itself is not a substitute for selective logging, it is an alternative to more aggressive chainsaw harvests while still promoting a variety of flora.
    Random Clusters, just a wild idea with no real empirical support other then my anecdotal observations. I don't claim to be and expert and not sure if my efforts would even be effective on other lands. Take it for what it is worth. A few pictures follow....
     
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  2. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    After effects of opening overstory and creating edge...
    IMG_0013B.jpg

    IMG_0070B.jpg

    IMG_0059B.jpg

    IMG_0018B.jpg

    IMG_0019B.jpg
     
  3. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I'm glad you finally posted this dogghr. Now, I'm trying to think of some of the positive things you are accomplishing or trying to accomplish with this. Here are my initial thoughts:

    * Creating lines of movement that could help with stand placement and you being able to pattern movements.
    * Possibly keeping deer on your property for longer periods of time to limit young deer getting shot somewhere else.

    These are the two that jump out at me quickly. What else am I missing?
     
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  4. lakngulf

    lakngulf Well-Known Member

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    dogghr been eating mushrooms and drinking mt. cider
     
  5. wbpdeer

    wbpdeer Well-Known Member

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    Getting his corn from a jar Lak.

    I skipped the equations - them days long gone for me.

    He is trying to get the deer to move where he wants. That is a goal many of us have. I have attended a field day that Jim Ward put on and he works hard on bedding sites and deer movement.

    Dogghr - thanks for the pictures.

    Wayne
     
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  6. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    "After hinging an area, I spread WW to attract my turkeys who churn up the ground promoting new growth of the now exposed soils" Loggers call this scarification. I thought that hiring the turkeys to do this habitat management work was original with me, but now I read that either; it's a common practice, or, we think alike.
    You have great thoughts on random clusters, although the electron math is above my head. However, my clusters are not so random, but are more the result of several things, what trees were growing in clusters due to seed distribution before I started manipulating, where I started cutting due to my random mood of the day, the terrain of the ridge that I was working along, knowing that the deer already wanted to travel through there, thus the reason to give them an edge to do it along.
    Either way, you've got a lot of good thoughts that you divulge somewhat slowly like a coffee percolator. So when making a random cluster, do you do the perimeter differently than the center because it's the "edge", feathered edge, thicker edge, thicker center, open center etc?
     
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  7. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    Trust me guys, I have no idea how that equation is to be worked. Just trying to add science to this thread and make it look like I'm a self-proclaimed authority on some kind of subject. And yes, I didn't quite get into the shine today, but had eyes dilated and was very bored sitting around.
    Hinging is really just a cheap alternative to intensive logging of property. My land when purchased 9 years ago was a well grazed cattle farm. No understory existed. The old farmer had regular selective cut his land which allowed a good variety age trees with curve toward the mature. While I will in the near future when I can oversee the logging my self, begin more aggressive cuts. But in the beginning, I just wanted to begin improving some edge affect and hopefully improve bedding. I began on side ridge points where deer would typically bed, and along pathways I felt they would follow. My deer bed in relation to elevation for the most part no matter what you do and as I progressed, a pattern developed.
    My lowest cluster is 100 yds off the alfalfa field and has become a doe magnet. Typically the clusters are 100-300 yds apart and follow the snake pattern of my plots on the east side100-400 yds within the wood. The attempt to increase edge in an mature forest at deer level worked despite my original intentions and led me to just improve on the pattern.
    It is an easy and simple alternative for landowners that aren't quite ready for a logging operation. It also allows managing a mature forests while still promoting browse, edge, safety, and bedding affect.
    Yes and yes. And this year thanks to improvement of #5, the deer /bucks definitely remained on my property for longer times , staying relaxed despite my ingress of ground hunting. My stands hung in topographical/flora edges before my hinging, they just improved the sites.
    That's a good chance and since our common weed is now legal in this state, who knows what else. I told my optometrist he should prescribe it for me in case I would ever have glaucoma. He declined.
    Yes I think we have similar lands and probably functions alike. Not sure of the spreading seed for turkey food, just a crazy idea I tried and it kinda works. I still thing fire, as I'm sure Geo would attest, would be the best choice to really get natural seed to explode, but I don't have the kahonas for that, so the turkey can just do their scratching.

    Don't take this too serious, as its just another of my random ramblings. But it does work.
     
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  8. Chainsaw

    Chainsaw Well-Known Member

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    Your concept is a home run for sure Dogghr and while every property is different I think your concept applies to properties everywhere. The title is especially catchy though your "random clusters" may not really be very random as you have chosen cluster locations specifically to match where the deer travel. And it makes absolutely perfect sense to create the random clusters with that in mind. The name is just so cool I predict that many outdoor writers will be using it very soon. It would be interesting to know just how much edge you have on your property as compared to neighboring properties that haven't made random clusters.
     
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  9. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

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    Been waiting for this thread, time to crack a cold one!
     
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  10. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Could your theory be expanded to include other things besides just hinging? I'm talking about items to draw their attention - like small food plots scattered at different places, salt licks scattered around, licking branch locations, fruit tree pockets, etc....

    Kind of like an amusement park... Or perhaps a better analogy - like the party guys skipping around town from bar to bar.
     
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  11. BenAllgood

    BenAllgood New Member

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    I think it's a great theory and pretty much right on with deer management in general. Manipulating habitat with the right degree of juxtaposition and interspersion is fundamental.
     
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  12. Triple C

    Triple C Well-Known Member

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    Love it when you get bored and start amusing us with mountain man logic brain dump. Good stuff!
     
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  13. Merle Hawggard

    Merle Hawggard Well-Known Member

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    I'd love to be able to understand this better, but I still struggle with how a -#×-#=+#.
    I'm gonna have the boys try and explain this.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G935A using Tapatalk
     
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  14. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    If you think about it, its just a modified perhaps less effective model of your deer sidewalks you have made. More on that shortly.
    Very good, you are a few pages ahead on the chapter and I've kinda done just that. I explain soon. See Native, thats why you could sit in the first chair of the class if you weren't such a trouble maker.
    Please do that and then explain it to us. I had both my shoes off and still couldn't do that math. Yea we do wear shoes here, sometimes.
     
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  15. Brian

    Brian Member

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    This is ridiculous - why wouldn't G = (V, E) be an infinite graph? And while I agree with a lot (or at lease some) of what you are saying, the fact that you used a dependent percolation model with sigma-algebra on a public forum is simply disturbing. Don't you know that some of us have children who might accidentally stumble on this thread?
     
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  16. Jack Terpack

    Jack Terpack Active Member

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    Now I'm traumatized. You're talking to a guy that just found out that πr² is not part of a sheetcake recipe.
     
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  17. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    Can't believe there is not a math guru on here that can't tell us how to work that equation even if it has nothing to do with this conversation.

    Now , remember I tend to manage for a mature timber stand. There is a misunderstanding that the early forests were of towering trees devoid of undergrowth and nothing could be further from the truth. At one time that understory was an almost unpentrable mess of brush, fallen trees, new growth, and food and cover to satisfy a wide. variety of animals, with a soil rich in nutrients. Read of the early explorers journals into these forests and their descriptions. Will give one great respect to mature oak producers you may have.

    Anyways, to answer a few questions I skipped over. Mennonite, I honestly just choose trees base on ease of cut, where they will fall, and more important if they are a tree I don't want or are crowding a tree I want to promote such as a mature oak. You have described your actions well elsewhere, in that you cut when the crowns are touching. Much my goal. I don't make the clusters in any form, no difference on perimeter or center. I cut then come back and add more cuts thru subsequent years and they begin to take their shape. I've tried making shoulder high hiding places as some suggest but see no deer ever take advantage of such. IF they bed at a cluster, it is always associated with its outer edge. I think deer, and especially bucks are attracted to horizontal appearance of the fallen trees backdropped by the typical vertical standing timber. And to them it is an edge, whether there is new growth or not.

    Chainsaw, I think as I said, these random cuttings are creating a pathway just as you have sprayed/cut deer sidewalks thru your timbered areas. I think you are creating an edge they like, just as my clusters. do. Big difference is that mine is like a hopscotch as they go from cluster, to cluster interspersed by more open/mature stands of timber, the latter of which is dropping litterly tons of food/acorns nearly every year. I have no desire to eliminate that food plot nature has provided. The clusters are random in that there is no even spacing or specific sizing of each cluster. Each RC may be and acre or just 30 yds long. The older ones are larger just by the inherit reworking each year.

    Native, to return to this theory being applied in other ways. Keep in mind I have land that is 80% timber and am surrounded by the same. The land in these hills, as opposed to flat land, dictates most anything done, including food plots. My plots are separated by topography and flora, and follow a snake pattern from the upper alfalfa to its adjacent grain/brassica combo, down along the hill to a perenial clover plot, then winding up into a near acre plot of clover/brassica/grain mixes. Always have the idea that deer tend to follow along this snake course, hopping from plot to plot, as they work from feed to bedding area. Some of it I've planned, some of it the land determined for me, much the same as the Random Clusters. Each provide a path for deer for the threes things deer search for....Sustenance/food, Safety, and Sex. The driving forces of all non human animals.

    Again, Random Cluster technique is probably not a fit for all properties, but still can be incorporated to various degrees with good success of patterning deer to our and their benefit. It might be of help for someone attempting to manage various age structures of oak they read some of the conversations in the Mighty Acorn thread http://deerhunterforum.com/index.php?threads/the-mighty-acorn.1814/.
    Again, just an option for managing timber and deer movements. Thanks for reading and any inputs, thats how we/I learn. And you won't hurt my feelings if you disagree , even if I know you are wrong. Just kidding of course.
     
  18. deer patch

    deer patch Active Member

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    Dogghr...I have a few of your RC and I have noticed that the older that the RC get, that is when the deer start to use them for bedding. I have some that are 10 years old that get used for bedding but the newer ones just get used for travel and some browsing.

    I have seen deer bed beside a single big downed tree more time than I can remember but I still like the ideal of the clusters. I've been putting some of my RC in low lying areas for when the deer want to bed out of the wind on the real windy days and that seems to get more use for bedding than the higher elevations which makes sense to me. Like you way...just my rambling thoughts.
     
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  19. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    I was just talking to a forester about deer habitat, and he stated how he relies heavily on sight distance in determining how soon habitat work should be done. This has also been my primary focus on analyzing a deer woods. Let site distance (sd) be an infinite graph, let (o) be visionary obstacles whose members are trees and bushes, and let x be the common denominator of hunter with b:bucks. Sd>×o=>b?
    It must be past my bedtime
     
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  20. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    I have to admit, except for one, I've never had any consistant bedding within a cut. Along the edges yes, but never within. I tried doing the cut high, stack them on each other so they can walk underneath like some suggest and it made no diff. But I agree, they do like areas wind protected and sun oriented in the wintertime.
    Well there you go. They say math is an absolute with no variances thus no argument of correct or wrong. And your equation is simpler. :) I agree with the sight distance idea regardless. Does he do so in summer or late winter, huge difference on most properties?
     

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