DCO issue

Discussion in 'Native Habitat Management' started by mattpatt, May 22, 2018.

  1. mattpatt

    mattpatt Active Member

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    Location:
    Brookston, TX
    Hardiness Zone:
    8
    Has anyone seen this before? It’s happening on pretty much all the new growth? Nutrient deficiency?

    [​IMG]


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  2. Turkey Creek

    Turkey Creek Well-Known Member

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    Could be a nutrient issue or could just be some environmental (wind or heat stress)
     
  3. Cap'n

    Cap'n Active Member

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    Location:
    Okla. City
    Could be too much water.


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  4. THE LLC

    THE LLC Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    Happened to my chinkapin oaks. Haven't noticed it on the DCO's.
     
  5. mattpatt

    mattpatt Active Member

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    Location:
    Brookston, TX
    Hardiness Zone:
    8
    Did you ever figure out what caused it?


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  6. mattpatt

    mattpatt Active Member

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    Location:
    Brookston, TX
    Hardiness Zone:
    8
    I hope not! I just threw some Osmocote fertilizer (the only fertilizer had on hand) and watered it in real good.

    Now we have a 60% chance of rain the next two days. Lol


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  7. mattpatt

    mattpatt Active Member

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    Location:
    Brookston, TX
    Hardiness Zone:
    8
    I put some slow release fertilizer on it yesterday and watered it in real good. Hopefully that’s it.

    Thought I had some 13-13-13 but I guess I used it all.


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  8. X-farmerdan

    X-farmerdan Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Richmond, Virginia, USDA Zone 7b
    It looks like it could be chlorosis to me...iron deficiency. Could your soil pH be too high?
    But it doesn't exactly look right for it....
     
  9. possum

    possum Active Member

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    Location:
    Clarkesville, GA
    Chlorosis will turn the leavesa light yellow and the veins will stay dark green.

    It’s not frost damage? I had some pear trees that tips turned brown after a light frost about a month ago
     
  10. THE LLC

    THE LLC Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    No.
     
  11. mattpatt

    mattpatt Active Member

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    Location:
    Brookston, TX
    Hardiness Zone:
    8
    We haven’t had a frost in two months. Way before the leaves came out.


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  12. Cap'n

    Cap'n Active Member

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    Location:
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    Osmocote wouldn't do that. It releases very slowly and even at a high rate would not tip burn. Try poking some holes in the soil to see if drying it out a little helps. I've lost a chestnut and a post oak due to too much watering and then unexpected rains right after. One came back from the root after I quit watering it. Also I had probably 2-3 " of mulch on them for winter so I pulled most of that off and it's doing fine.
     
  13. 144

    144 Active Member

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    Location:
    North LA
    Seems like I had a similar problem with some Dunstans a couple of years ago. They were still in pots and I was waiting to transplant in the fall. I had them watered on a timer and I believe they were overwatered. The leaves stayed that way for the rest of the season. Once I transplanted them that winter, haven’t had the issue since.


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  14. TreeDaddy

    TreeDaddy Active Member

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    Location:
    walton,texas
    Im not sure that Matt could over water in texas heat with a well drained media.....even if he tried.....

    boll
     
  15. X-farmerdan

    X-farmerdan Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Richmond, Virginia, USDA Zone 7b
    I'm gonna come back around to chlorosis. I agree a lot of trees suffering from an iron have yellowing leaves with veins staying somewhat green....but that's not the exclusive symptom. Or, this is another nutrient deficiency related to soil ph.
    I think we can agree the tree we are looking at thrives in soils with 'lower' acidic soils.
    I don't know where Brookstone, Texas is or if the tree is even in Texas, but I'll take a leap.

    I lean on this map a lot.....
    Generally, soils in the areas where you see blue are naturally above 7.0 and the browns below that.

    crop1600.jpg

    pH20110321.jpg
     
  16. THE LLC

    THE LLC Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    That map is dead on about Georgia I can tell you that. LOL
     

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