daikon radish

Discussion in 'Food Plots for Wildlife' started by Doe Shooter, Dec 15, 2018.

  1. Doe Shooter

    Doe Shooter Active Member

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    Location:
    West -Central Illinois
    Hardiness Zone:
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    For general info. This year we planted close to 40 acres of daikon radish in a soil improvement strategy.We planted a buffer strip around all fields of alfalfa and several clovers. If it proved to be a deer magnet ,all the better. I put a plot watcher on a 15 acre segment , which was a 20 year honey hole. If we were looking for a deer repellent,the radish would be a good choice. I really was not expecting much. I've planted small radish plots before. Something chewed on them. I was not sure what.That said, on a 10 acre field we left 4 rows of corn standing. On that field 3 of us took a number meat deer. The lesson is deer eat what they like first. The pic is one of about a dozen deer caught in 8 weeks. On balance the radish will help on soil, and previous test plantings have proven it's worth.

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  2. catscratch

    catscratch Well-Known Member

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    Interesting. Deer love radish tops on my place but won't touch the tubers. When did you plant the alfalfa/clover strips? Last fall or this spring? I've considered that mix before but have always just went with clovers.

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  3. Doe Shooter

    Doe Shooter Active Member

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    Location:
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    Fall plant. I would avoid any large scale planting alfalfa or clover anytime April to August.
     
  4. catscratch

    catscratch Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. I figured that was the case but wasn't sure from your original post. How long do you intend to keep the strips? Do you anticipate clover or alfalfa becoming the dominant plant?
     
  5. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Huntingdon Co. PA
    Hardiness Zone:
    6a
    I've been planting a 2-3-5 mix of rape, purple top turnips, and diakon radishes for four years now. The first year I didn't have a nice crop and the deer ignored them. The second year they ate a few. The third year was a bumper crop and the deer ate some, but quite a few rotted. This fourth year the deer are addicted to turnips and radishes and none will go to waste, they seem to be grazing the three about equally. A deer that is addicted to a certain food is fun to watch, these deer will leave their bedding to get their fix at 1 PM in the afternoon, a time when any normal deer is sleeping. If I'd have given up before the fourth year I'd have missed a real show, and overlooked a plot planting that outlasts clover into the winter. My plans for next year include more brassica than ever.
    P.S. Here in PA zone 6 I learned that I need to put out my brassica earlier than most people recommend, July 1st or even some PTT in early June to grow the size bulbs that the deer are looking for. I also do some layered planting with peas, oats, rye and brassica, starting in June with turnips and ending in September with rye.
     
  6. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Hawaii/North Carolina
    Hardiness Zone:
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    I planted PTT, DER, and DR along with clover and cereal grains last September. I'm also in zone 6 so the brassicas didn't do much but there is definite browsing evidence. IF the MR clover isn't too thick this year I'll add brassicas again.

    The preference difference throughout country is fascinating. I’m in mountainous timber country with no ag for miles. I don’t think our deer are very picky.

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    Last edited: Dec 15, 2018
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  7. Doe Shooter

    Doe Shooter Active Member

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    Location:
    West -Central Illinois
    Hardiness Zone:
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    I want to maintain the buffer strips going forward. You usually don't get anything 5 rows planted up next to the timber anyway. I planted the GHR,DER,AND PTT + CLOVER several times with mixed results except for the clover the following spring. A good stand of alfalfa will get hammered all through the winter, even pawing through 8" of snow to get at it. Corn is going in next spring in the radish fields. Some of the corn will go for silage. This field needed some help with compaction/plow pan thus the radish planting. We have a couple small fields we try different things on. If they return favorable results ,then comes the larger scale trial. Any good steward is looking for sustainable yield/practices to avoid the bio-desert effect. We have earth worms in our fields. You would be surprised how many fields do not. Our deer are not going hungry. But if they have a few rows of corn ,soybeans and alfalfa to eat ,they just are not interested in anything else. A friend 200 miles south, where they harvest and fall plow, has ptt just torn up. Every location is unique.
     
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  8. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    I used to grow brassica waist deep with amazing tubors that lasted into Feb. Now the deer love them so much they are gone before hunting season with no chance to develope bulbs. Its a mix of DER, daikon radish, PTT, Kale. Mixed in anymore with grains and RC. The Daikon radish, whatever brand you choose, is for me the most expensive and waste as the deer eat it as it sprouts. This is with plenty of alfalfa, clover , grains, in my plots and farmer cornfields nearby. I shouldn't plant the forage radish, but I'm still a fool for feeding my deer. Attribute my plot varieties of giving the best venison I've ever had and others attest to.
    And even if deer won't eat your turnips and radish, if the deer will allow tubor growth, the soil busting, soil nutrient additions, and mining of the deep soil, make them worth your time.
     
  9. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    Wisdom backed by experience, that's why I always read your posts!
     
  10. Elkaddict

    Elkaddict Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    I’m not a fan of radish monocultures...most rot in the fields. I still plant them as part of LC’s mix, but do so for spreading out my planting dates (I aim for 3rd week of July). For producing palatable tonnage, I far prefer rutabagas/Winfred planted a month earlier. I find far mor sheds in the rutabagas/Winfred than the LC mix. At the end of the day, I find a buffet line is the most effective means for getting movement (presently planting alfalfa, clovers/chicory, corn, beans, triticale and brassicas). If uncovered by snow, the deer will hit all every morning/evening in our largest plot complex.
     
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  11. MarkDarvin

    MarkDarvin Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Fordville, ND
    Hardiness Zone:
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    When I first started on my plots, I couldn't dig up a single worm with a shovel. After I got the lime on, and a winter cycle of rye, the earth worm pop exploded by that next summer.

    I'm going to custom mix my own brassicas after I run out of the seed I have now. I'm one that gets brassicas hammered anyway, and radish always goes first. I'd rather knock it down to 2/3 rape, and 1/3 turnips. Maybe then I'd get bigger bulbs and more tops before the deer get going.
     
  12. Baker

    Baker Well-Known Member

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    I like daikons, great for the soil and deer love them. Years back they just ate the tops . This year they have started eating the tubers aggressively as well. This from no till multi specie year round cover crop rotations. No fertilizer. IMG_1740.jpg
     
  13. MarkDarvin

    MarkDarvin Well-Known Member

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    Radish like that about requires a deeper explanation of methods, species, timing, nutrient prep and management etc.
     
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  14. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    Rusty, that has to be the Blue Ribbon Winner there !
     
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  15. Triple C

    Triple C Well-Known Member

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    Mercy Baker! Looks like you've had those radish on roids. We add em every year to our mix. Always find the deer hit the radish tops before the turnip tops on our place. Just curious on your jacket...Is that an old Cabela's brand proprietary camo pattern?
     
  16. Baker

    Baker Well-Known Member

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    Makes me smile. Big radishes...big deer. Win win

    Mark, I drilled radishes, wheat and red clover into a sunn hemp, cow pea, soy bean, sunflower, buck wheat field terminated with a roller crimper. I rotate back and forth summer multi specie plantings with fall multi specie plantings all no till. I stopped using synthetic fertilizer years ago. Only occasionally use gly as a last resort but essentially organic.

    In the beginning I had lousy soil that I tilled , used synthetic fertilizer and sprayed. Kept getting lousier. I changed approach about 4 years ago and have been delighted with results . Deer are doing pretty good too. Everything in the mixes I use they like.
     
  17. Baker

    Baker Well-Known Member

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    Ha, I know why you recognize it! Had it for a long time.
     
  18. Doe Shooter

    Doe Shooter Active Member

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    Location:
    West -Central Illinois
    Hardiness Zone:
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    Always something green growing. Soil builds from the top down. Sustainable ag pays off. Leave the ground better than you found it.
     
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  19. Triple C

    Triple C Well-Known Member

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    Got one just like it from 1990 or 91. I'll have to post a pic in that thing. Windstopper liner and one cool camo pattern that I always loved.
     
  20. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    Holy tuber Baker! Theres a dude in china wondering where that hole leads to.
     

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