Concordia Oaks

Discussion in 'Native Habitat Management' started by mattpatt, Jul 26, 2018.

  1. mattpatt

    mattpatt Active Member

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    Location:
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    Curious how everyone’s trees are doing? The ones in my yard are five years old now and appear to have several viable acorns on them this year. When I say viable I mean they appear to be growing and getting bigger compared to others on the same tree. So maybe I’ll get a few of them to grow next year and who knows I may have a few to trade as well.

    [​IMG]

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  2. Nebraskaz71

    Nebraskaz71 Active Member

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    I grew a couple two or three years ago, none came to life this year so I cant say but goodluck with yours! lookin good
     
  3. Fishman

    Fishman Member

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    Did you buy them as seedlings or grow them from acorns? Approximately how tall are the trees? They look good and that is fantastic that you are getting acorns already. I have thought about ordering some from MDC later this year and seeing how they do.
     
  4. mattpatt

    mattpatt Active Member

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    Location:
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    Purchased from MDC the first year they offered them as seedlings which I believe was five years ago. I planted three in my yard and the rest went to the deer woods. Last year, the ones in my yard tried to make a few acorns but none of them ever got pollinated and they fell off mid-summer. This year it looks as if about 50% or more of them are getting big and growing which is a good sign that they may have gotten pollinated. These trees also receive a good watering about once a week. The ones out in the deer woods never get supplemental water just trying to survive and have yet to try to produce any acorns. Just goes to show the difference a little water can make. It also demonstrate the hardiness of this tree as it has been able to withstand some pretty serious drought conditions but at the expense of not producing acorns.

    Matt


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  5. THE LLC

    THE LLC Well-Known Member

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    Mine are growing really well, but no acorns. I think they are about 8 years old now.
     
  6. mattpatt

    mattpatt Active Member

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    Location:
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    That is surprising that yours are that old and haven’t produced at least a few. Do they receive any supplemental water? Like I said the ones I baby in my yard looks like they may have a few this year. The ones in the deer woods that don’t receive extra water are growing but haven’t even tried to produce acorns yet.

    Matt


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  7. mattpatt

    mattpatt Active Member

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    Location:
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    Has anyone noticed variances in acorn size with their Concordias? I have two trees that set acorns this year. One has acorns about the size and shape that I would expect for this type of oak tree.

    [​IMG]

    The acorns on the other tree however, resemble more like a bur at this stage of their development. They about 75% bigger than acorns on the other tree and are more round like a bur.

    [​IMG]

    Matt


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  8. mattpatt

    mattpatt Active Member

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    Location:
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    Okay so I got to studying the pics I took and noticed something. The leaves appear to be different. Went out and checked again and sure enough they are.

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    So which one is which? I think I have the Concordia labeled correctly. If so what is the unknown? He reason I think I have the Concordia correct is that I planted three of these trees (supposedly) in my yard that all came from MDC. The rest went to the deer woods. Of the three that are in my yard two of them have the same leaves as the one on the right but only one of those had acorns this year. The other tree is the one that I’m questioning because the leaves don’t match.

    Matt


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  9. THE LLC

    THE LLC Well-Known Member

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    The unknown looks like a burr or burr hybrid to me. Not Concordia---or at least not like the three I have.
     
  10. mattpatt

    mattpatt Active Member

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    Location:
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    That’s what I’m thinking too. All three were supposed to be Concordia. If they mixed a burr in with mine makes you wonder how many others may have been inadvertently mixed in and sold as Concordia?


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  11. TreeFan

    TreeFan Member

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    My bet is that they were all Concordia acorns but one was pollinated by a bur and hybridized. I am no expert, but I would expect that these nurseries have a challenge keeping a strain pure with all the "dust like" pollin floating around in the spring. I bought 4 Burgamble from a nursery and ended up with 3 Burgambles and an unknown type white. I collected 30 Chinkapins last fall and ended up with 14 Chinkapin, 15 white and one burr. I did not see any other Chinkapins in the area of that tree. All my DCO's look like DCO's and do not appear to hybridize or they will not pollinate from another oak type tree. This leads me to believe that some trees are more susceptible to hybridization than others.. Interesting, and again, I am certainly no expert...
     
  12. mattpatt

    mattpatt Active Member

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    Location:
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    I guess we will see how it plays out. Im certainly not going to cut it down or anything like that. Next time I’m down in the deer woods I’m going to pay more attention to the leaves on all the other Concordias and try to determine what I really have. My one complaint is that it would be real easy for the the nursery to compare leaf patterns when they grow them as seedlings and only select the ones they know have a similar leaf pattern to the Concordia. The others could be tagged and bagged as hybrids.

    My biggest issue now is that the reason I planted what I thought were three Corncordias in my yard is so that I would have a few trees that were close by that I could harvest acorns from and start to grow my own Concordia for future plantings. Now that I have this Burr Hybrid in the mix it’s highly probable that they will cross pollinated and that may or may not be a bad thing. It would obviously be easier for deer to eat the smaller size acorn of the Concordia than a Burr.

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    Last edited: Aug 16, 2018 at 10:40 AM
  13. Fishman

    Fishman Member

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    Did the acorn with the hairy cap come off the unknown or off what you think is a Concordia? The leaves look like a bur oak. The acorn looks like a bur oak. My uneducated guess is that they accidentally sent you a bur oak instead of a Concordia oak.

    Do you have other bur oaks around to pollinate your unknown tree? I know you wanted a Concordia, but if it is a bur, its acorns are probably a pretty good seed stock. Getting acorns from a bur that is five-years-old is pretty incredible.
     
  14. mattpatt

    mattpatt Active Member

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    Location:
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    It came off the unknown. I’m pretty sure it’s a burr oak. Now if it’s some sort of hybrid is another question. I do know that it did come in the bundle of trees that MDC labeled as being Concordia Oaks that I purchased the first year they offered them which was five years ago. It is also roughly the same size and height as the others in my yard that I planted the same year. There are no other burr oaks in my yard so it had to have crossed with the Condordias or there may be a native oak somewhere around that I’m not aware of.

    Matt


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  15. THE LLC

    THE LLC Well-Known Member

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    Just remember, the Concordia itself is a hybrid---a three way cross to be exact. So, I would imagine they would be HIGHLY susceptible to hybridization.
     

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