Chickasaw Plum?

Discussion in 'Fruit Trees' started by Mitch123, Jul 7, 2019.

  1. Mitch123

    Mitch123 Active Member

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    Location:
    Eastern WV
    Hardiness Zone:
    6
    I believe this is a Chickasaw plum, but by far am not an expert. Any thoughts? I do know that they are SUPER sweet, and that after shaking the tree and some of the fruit falling off the deer absolutely love them.
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  2. buckdeer1

    buckdeer1 Well-Known Member

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    Nope, chickasaw plum is same as sand hill plum and is a shrub
     
  3. Mitch123

    Mitch123 Active Member

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    Location:
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    Thank you! The flesh also is a dark purple right now if that helps.
     
  4. Mitch123

    Mitch123 Active Member

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    Location:
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    Hardiness Zone:
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    Methley plum maybe???
     
  5. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    I'm just sitting on my stool popping open a cold one waiting on Native just tell us what it is. He'll be around soon I feel, can't resist the challenge.
     
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  6. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I wish it was that easy to say for sure, but it isn't. One problem is how plums hybridize. Another problem is how that plums from other countries were brought here and no one really knows all of the places that have naturalized. I would just be glad I had a nice plum that was producing fruit that the deer loved.

    With that said, you say you are in Eastern WV. There is a plum that grows there called the Beach Plum (Prunus maritima). It is most generally found near the beaches but will grow inland. It generally has really purple fruit like yours. It is usually a shrub, but if crowded or pruned like a tree, it can grow 18 feet tall. The fruit of this one usually doesn't ripen until August, but there can be variations (like persimmons) and it could be a hybrid, which could change the ripening time.

    Chickasaw Plum can grow 25 feet tall according to the USDA - even though it is usually much shorter in a shrub form. Some of them can ripen in May or June, and seedling trees vary a lot with the fruit color. However, I don't think they are usually as deep purple as your fruit appears to be.

    The Methley you mentioned is thought to be a cross between a Japanese and American plum. It is a good possibility because it does ripen early, and even though fruit color can vary a lot, it has a tendency to have a purple cast.

    To say 100% what you have from just those pictures, I say is highly unlikely, but my hat is off to anyone who can. Good luck, and like I said - be happy you have a nice plum.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2019
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  7. Mitch123

    Mitch123 Active Member

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    Location:
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    I’ll take it! I was waiting for your opinion native knowing you are the fruit expert. I collected about 5 pounds of the plums and made some amazing jam, also kept a bunch of the pits to try my hand on getting some to grow.
     
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  8. buckdeer1

    buckdeer1 Well-Known Member

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    I agree they can grow tall I have some that are around 12 ft,they are just getting ripe here in Kansas.They will be a deep red when ripe.They aren't any fun to pick with the thorns.They are planted and grow very well in sandy soil,I have actually never seen any around on black dirt.They used to grow wild in the fence rows years ago but were finally sprayed and killed.I have planted a couple thousand in shrub blocks
     
  9. buckdeer1

    buckdeer1 Well-Known Member

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  10. wbpdeer

    wbpdeer Well-Known Member

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    Native your knowledge on fruit and habitat stuff is amazing!

    What plums are easy to grow, deer like and don't have thorns. If I can get a plum that satisfies these three things I would add them our farm. I don't like dealing with flat tires so I got rid of honey locust for that reason.

    As always thanks for your assistance.

    Wayne
     
  11. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Wayne, even though I have my lesson up on disease resistant apple and pear varieties, I haven't put much time into thornless plums. In Tennessee and KY, the Chickasaw is probably the best and most reliable - BUT, it does have thorns. I have a few of these along with the common American Plum (also has thorns) at my farm, and the fruit production of these trees is acceptable, although not prolific.

    At my home I have a Santa Rosa, which is thornless. It is a good plum when everything goes well, but I've also seen years when the fruit falls off prematurely. I suspect that if I took the time to spray it, things would be much better. I think that is the case for most thornless plums. I've heard good things about Damson, and I've also heard that the "Stanley-prune plum" is easy to grow. If I was going to try any others for home production, I would probably try those.

    I've been so preoccupied with apples, pears and persimmons that I just haven't delved into the plums (or peaches) very much.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2019

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