Campground build

Discussion in 'How to Build Stuff' started by weekender21, Jul 31, 2020.

  1. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    Hardiness Zone:
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    Now that we're in the same time zone as our property we're building a semi permanent camping area. Right now the plan is a short gravel driveway leading to a small gravel parking area with a 20'x60' manufactured sand over gravel area for tents, picnic table, fire pit, etc. The cost of this little project is several thousand dollars thanks mainly to the price of materials.

    Are we over engineering the gravel/sand tent camping area? I certainly don't mind camping on a "lawn" so white dutch clover and grass is certainly an option.

    Thoughts?

    Thanks!!!
     
    MarkDarvin likes this.
  2. Triple C

    Triple C Well-Known Member

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    weekender - Wouldn't change a thing. I remember many years ago when I was in a lease and we set up the camping area in a lush grassy area that worked fine until mid-November when the ground didn't dry out and rain came often. Turned into a mud pit. Anywhere you will be parking and setting up camp will be much nicer and more comfortable with a good base of gravel. The very first thing I did after purchasing my place was have gravel hauled in and spread.
     
    weekender21 likes this.
  3. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Huntingdon Co. PA
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    In our area we have crusher run, 2Amodified, or 2RC quarry fill available at a much cheaper prices, it is sand and gravel mixed ,these compact very well, and make a nice multipurpose surface.
     
    weekender21 likes this.
  4. MarkDarvin

    MarkDarvin Well-Known Member

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    Always be doing stuff you can build onto. I spent a good deal of money on a new road approach, taking trees down, taking topsoil off, crowning, packing, leveling, draining, and bringing in gravel. So happy that I did. Every property around me without site prep has to deal with mud and rutted up yards until well into May, when I'm dry in early April. And I only sit about 5' above the water table.

    I'd try to figure out what you want it to look like 2-5 years from now, and start on that. Figure out how to use now what you're building for later.
     
    weekender21 likes this.
  5. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    Thanks for all the advice and ideas...decisions decisions.
     
  6. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    As a guy who made his living in the dirt business for over 50 years Mark, your advice is spot on ! Too bad I failed to take that advice a couple times !:( Trying to save money mostly just costs us money in the long run.
     

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