Bunch grass

Discussion in 'Name This Plant' started by Tap, Feb 14, 2019.

  1. Tap

    Tap Well-Known Member

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    I been meaning to ask for more than a year...what is this grass?
    Grows in bunches. Gets browsed in fall somewhat, but is getting hit pretty hard during the winter.

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  2. Tap

    Tap Well-Known Member

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    Oops, forgot to add pics....[​IMG][​IMG]

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  3. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I would like to see some pics of it when it makes a head and also know about the height, etc....

    It might be orchard grass. I've seen it eaten pretty well at times.
     
  4. Tap

    Tap Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I figured those pics might not be enough for ID...especially winter time pics.
    It doesn't look like the Orchard grass that I already have. These leaves are a bit heavier, more coarse, etc.
    I've watched this grass go thru a full season and haven't noticed heads, but maybe I just haven't paid close enough attention.
    I will monitor the stuff. Obviously, this may take several months.......................

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  5. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I am interested in finding out myself since it seems to be browsed pretty well. Just get back with more info as it becomes available.
     
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  6. j-bird

    j-bird Well-Known Member

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    I have a plant like this on my place as well. I was told it was some sort of sedge (wood sedge I think) and thus why is tends to stay somewhat green. the stuff I have has a bit more of a fleshy sort of blade to it than say timothy or orchardgrass. I have it in more damp areas. I am not sure if that is what it is or not...but just what I was told.
     
  7. Tap

    Tap Well-Known Member

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    It doesnt look like any sedge Ive ever seen. Not saying it couldn't be sedge but if it is sedge, its an odd ball variety for here.

    And I'm not necessarily saying I want to eradicate the stuff. As time goes on, I'm realizing that plants that get moderate seasonal use are sometimes desired. High DPSM with plant of high desirability leads to over use and soil damage.

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  8. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    Hardiness Zone:
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    Interesting. Deer rarely graze on grass because they cannot digest the high levels of lignin. If this wasin the grain family it would have lower lignin levels, although grain doesn't grow on bunches. It looks like tall fescue. When the deer are eating fescue it means they have few other choices.
     
  9. momark

    momark New Member

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    I'm 90% sure it's a sedge based on leaf structure and growth habit. Have no idea which one, though. A lot easier to identify when it has a seed head on it.
     
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  10. X-farmerdan

    X-farmerdan Well-Known Member

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    I don't know either. Upon seeing the picture for the first time, sedge was my immediate reaction. After reading the comments above, my brain wondered off to some kind of brome grass. Long ago at the coop we used to sell a lot of it for on pastures-- it along with orchard grass and/or timothy, and/or tall fescue. Is there a brome sedge? Tap, what's the soil like in the area where? Wet? Low pH? Weedy? Pasture?

    Anyhow, I don't see deer eating whatever it is....

    I keep adding to this. Another of my brain bubbles burst. The clipped ends of the grass are very straight and clean. My understanding is that deer rip and don't snip. Could rabbits be eating this, um, whatever it is?
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2019
  11. Tap

    Tap Well-Known Member

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    I doubt that it's rabbits eating it. We have bunnies but not that many and I seldom see them in the areas where the grass in question is. If rabbits are eating it, it would have to be nocturnal activity.

    The field...
    Seasonally wet slope. North exposure. There's a lot of water that drains down the slope during winter and spring, but it dries-out (during normal years) in summer and fall. Fairly loamy, I guess there is a small % of clay. pH is decent...around 6.4. OM is very good, ~ 5% to 7%. It's never been a pasture, at least not since the 1950s or so. It was mostly a hay field for a few decades until I bought it in 1985. I used to just mow it a few times a summer, but around the late 1990s, I started plotting it. Usually clover, but there has also been different varieties of brassica and a few years of sunflowers. I no longer do any tillage on this slope...too easy to lose topsoil during a rain event. Just throw n mow or minor discing for a few years, now.
    Currently, it's a clover plot that's on it's last leg. I need to use up some N. I had planned on sunflowers last summer, but my illness kept me from doing much of anything.

    I do have 3 sedges here...purple, yellow and broom. This stuff is not one of those, I'm sure of it.
     
  12. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    I'm sorry to hear that you've been ill. Here's to hoping that you get on top of it!
     
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  13. Tap

    Tap Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. Everything is back to normal. Kinda had the perfect storm hit me. Docs originally thought leukemia, then lymphoma. Turned out to be an internal fungal infection. Caused fevers almost daily...highest one was almost 105. Most likely caused by meds for rheumatoid arthritis. All is good now.
     
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  14. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Glad to hear that! That's like, whew what a relief.
     
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  15. Tap

    Tap Well-Known Member

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    Here are some current pics, taken today.
    This stuff is exploding.[​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

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  16. Elkaddict

    Elkaddict Well-Known Member

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    I’ve got that on my place—also thought it was some kind of sedge. Has very fine seed heads as I recall. Tough to kill. Gly tolerance reminds me of clover. Seems to laugh at cleth.
     
  17. Tap

    Tap Well-Known Member

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    I'm pretty sure its not a sedge, but I could be wrong.
    May not be able to ID it until it heads out.

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  18. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Looking forward to seeing the seed head. Are they still browsing it?
     
  19. Tap

    Tap Well-Known Member

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    No, not browsing it now but they did continue to hammer it thru the winter.

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  20. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I'm in the mood to do some guessing tonight, so I will take a stab at this one. I believe it is Spreading Sedge (Carex laxiculmis). Everything fits on this including the semi-evergreen characteristic. See pictures I found below. Let me know what you think.

    https://www.abnativeplants.com/plant/Carex-laxiculmis-Hobb

    https://wildridgeplants.com/shop/carex-laxiculmis-spreading-sedge/

    http://usinggeorgianativeplants.blogspot.com/2012/10/carex-like-you-mean-it.html

    http://www.southeasternflora.com/view_flora.php?plantid=2221
     

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