Brush pile debris help

Discussion in 'Native Habitat Management' started by Prelude8626, Mar 14, 2019.

  1. Prelude8626

    Prelude8626 Member

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    Location:
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    Hardiness Zone:
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    just curious what you all normally do with brush piles. I just got done expanding a food plot and have a couple brush piles that I need to either move or get rid of. What do you all normally do with your brush.
     
  2. OkieKubota

    OkieKubota Moderator Staff Member

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    Use it to funnel deer into the plot where I want...
     
    Eshoremd likes this.
  3. T-Max

    T-Max Well-Known Member

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    Kansas - Zone 5b
    Like Okie said. If they aren't in the right spot for that, we usually wait for a little snow cover on the ground and then burn...
     
  4. j-bird

    j-bird Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Decatur county, IN Zone 6a
    Yep....use it to block the deer from certain areas or use them as tree cages or even just to screen the plot from the woods to create a softer edge. It's a pain to do it...but it far more productive use of it then just burning it. You can just leave them as well, rabbits and other critters will use them as cover.
     
  5. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    I'm kinda OCD about brushpiles. I used to burn them all, but now I leave some for the small game. I'm on Wildlife Exemption for property tax purposes and one of the recommended practices is brushpiles. I have a bunch of little ones that I'll keep but two humongous ones that I'll burn when conditions are right. Coons are probably denned up in them anyway and me and coons don't gee-haw.
     
    Doe Shooter likes this.
  6. FL Plotter

    FL Plotter Active Member

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    Location:
    NW Florida
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    Pile em up and let em rot
    Pile em up and burn em
    Pile em up, then back the bushhog into them and pulverize them!

    #3 is the most fun.
     
    MattJK likes this.
  7. MattJK

    MattJK Member

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    Location:
    Tazewell, Mason, Grundy County in IL
    How flat is your farm? While not ideal for wildlife, lots of my brush ends up in ravine points or drainages. It is surprisingly effective for erosion control.
     
    Mennoniteman likes this.
  8. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    84" titan root grapple on FEL, move the brush piles where you want them with no sweat equity involved.
    Screenshot_20190316-212427_Chrome.jpg
     
  9. MarkDarvin

    MarkDarvin Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Fordville, ND
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    It should really depend on what you have for brush, how it’s laying, and where it is. I’ve got all kinds of different uses for brush, both scattered and piled.

    This mess of bigger ash trees was intentionally jenga’d as high as I could stack them to be a deep woods cover/bedding area.
    [​IMG]


    This one is mostly softwoods that will rot in a few years. I left them all over right where they fell to help hold up the grass for a couple years.
    [​IMG]


    Sometimes I drop it right on top of stuff I’m trying to protect or release.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Mennoniteman likes this.
  10. snowracerh

    snowracerh Active Member

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    Location:
    Western Wisconsin
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    I leave em where they fall - the more the merrier. Winter browse, cover for small critters, ground level cover for deer bedding, natural sapling protection and eventually rot into organic matter.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
     
  11. Brushpile

    Brushpile Moderator Staff Member

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    Believe it or not, I burn all of mine. Brush piles attract rodents that girdle small trees and attract predators.
     
    Mennoniteman likes this.
  12. George

    George Well-Known Member

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    I don't mind small brush piles for bunnies where I will not be burning in the future but I do not need them to direct deer movement so they are burned.

    G
     
  13. BenAllgood

    BenAllgood Member

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    Location:
    Louisiana and Kentucky (Zone 6B)
    If you have a lot of open areas, create funnels with them. If you have food plots or fields that need funnels across them, string them in a line for screening growth or stand access walkways. Birds will perch on them and drop seeds and naturally plant you a screen.
     
    snowracerh likes this.
  14. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    And the wood ash has a PH value similar to lime.
     
    Bowhunter likes this.
  15. Bowhunter

    Bowhunter Active Member

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    Location:
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    I typically burn all my trees and tops when I either expand or create new food plots. Like @Mennoniteman mentioned it also benefits the soil. The stumps that I push out with the dozer I’ll leave on the edge for a few years to rot and break down, and then I’ll incorporate it back into the plot when it’s ready to do so.
     
    Mennoniteman likes this.
  16. Prelude8626

    Prelude8626 Member

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    Location:
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    Hardiness Zone:
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    Any tricks to burning brush piles in the woods. I only have about a 1/4 acre opening and have never done any brush pile burning and I'm scared to death that I'll set the woods on fire.
     
  17. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    I've set the woods on fire. No major damage and It's only a $400 fine. I had good fire breaks and a controlled burn, everything was good, the fire was out. Fully eight days after the burn when I wasn't around a big wind came along and relit it where it was smoldering under a stump, blew burning leaves across the fire break, and the neighbors called the fire co. Burning is just too much trouble for me anymore, and I was never quite on board with the air pollution, air quality is important to me. I use logging, discing, glyphosate, and bushhogging as my habitat tools now. Just let your brush piles rot away, they aren't doing any harm. Some extra rodents and rabbits are all a part of the food chain in a balanced ecosystem.
     
    Bowhunter likes this.
  18. Prelude8626

    Prelude8626 Member

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    Location:
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    This is exactly what I was thinking would be the best bet haha
     

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