Browse preference discussion

Discussion in 'Native Habitat Management' started by Hoosierhunting, Feb 9, 2020.

  1. Hoosierhunting

    Hoosierhunting Active Member

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    Location:
    N. Indiana Zone 5b
    IMG_0583.JPG

    These graphs are supposed to represent browse preference in a study in my area (IN). My personal experience is a little different. What’s yours? Agree? If not where did they get it wrong.


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  2. MarkDarvin

    MarkDarvin Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    ND and Northern MN
    I see heavy bur oak browsing on my place. For every one that made it past the deer, there are probably 50 that don't. It's not a problem though because I have bur oak seedlings everywhere. I've actually cut even more down to pick a winner. There's a good next generation crop of them coming that are about 8' tall and an inch or two at the base.

    Just when I think I've got browse figured out, I discover something new. On my place (wet and flat), when I clear an area, the hardest hit stuff is ash sprouts. When I started, red osier dogwood didn't stand a chance and I had no soft mast. I'm starting to get ahead of that. I go out and find flowering stuff in spring (chokecherry, juneberry) and mark it for clearing later on. I keep the oaks and birch, and knock down ash and poplar to turn them into stump feed and ground cover. Also save the balsam fir, black spruce, dogwood, maple (don't have much maple), arrowwood viburnum, hazelnut, and beaked hazel. If I find something I can't ID, and it's rare, I keep it.

    Lots of flowers come when the sun starts hitting the ground too. Found a handful of new flowers for the first time this past summer in one of my select cuts. Skull caps, jewelweed, swamp aster, and willowherb come to mind.
     
  3. Okvet03

    Okvet03 New Member

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    Location:
    Tornado alley
    Hardiness Zone:
    7
    This may have been posted in another area. It's a piece put out by the Noble Institute in Ardmore, OK so the results may be more applicable to native cross timber habitat. Either way it was an interesting read. If you prefer a google search for the .pdf, the title is White-Tailed Deer Their Foods and Management in the Cross Timbers.
    http://oklaenvirothon.org/pdfs/wildlife/white-tailed-deer.pdf
     
  4. bearcat

    bearcat Member

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Fort Worth, TX / Love Co. OK
    Hardiness Zone:
    7b
    This is good read. I found it very helpful.
    I’ve got a place that nearly borders one of the Noble ranches.


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  5. catscratch

    catscratch Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Kansas It's better to wear out than to rust out.
    I've posted this one several times. Gives crude protein levels per month, preference, and palatibility (if I remember right). Really good info for someone looking at native deer foods. I've used it a ton when looking at managing plants on our place.
    nf-wf-04-02.pdf
     
  6. Okvet03

    Okvet03 New Member

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    Location:
    Tornado alley
    Hardiness Zone:
    7
    Thanks for posting! I'll check it out this evening.
     
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  7. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Monroe County, WV
    Personally I ask the deer. And the deer tell me that if I drop a maple they are on it like bees on honey. Next would b the Silkies. They chow down any not protected. The other Dogs are close attraction. And they rub the heck out of any Dog. Hazelnuts I’ve planted are browsed but not much. The other trees will be browsed on that list but they know the candy.
    Feb/ March are good months to ck browse as they are in a high stress survival mode as winter comes to an end. Check browse and if they have eaten past the first knuckle of growth on your plants, you need to create more woody browse or reduce the herd.
    Interesting charts tho. Thanks for showing. Doubt my deer have read them tho.


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  8. letemgrow

    letemgrow Active Member

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    Location:
    Olathe, KS-Mercer, MO
    Eastern Wahoo is definitely an ice cream plant on my place. It’s only found where deer can’t reach them.

    They really pound dogwoods and buttonbush on multiple areas I’ve seen in MO and KS.


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