Broadcasting into standing crops

Discussion in 'Food Plots for Wildlife' started by Dot3, Feb 14, 2020.

  1. Dot3

    Dot3 New Member

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    Location:
    NE NC
    Hardiness Zone:
    7a
    I’d like to hear some of your successes and challenges in broadcasting seed into standing crops. Especially some of you who deal with a lot of cotton. Does it work for you? What kinds of seed do you use? Have you ever created a weed problem?
     
  2. j-bird

    j-bird Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Decatur county, IN Zone 6a
    I have NO experience with cotton.....I have broadcast into standing corn (30" centers) and soybeans (15" centers) before. I tend to broadcast smaller seed....brassica (radish and turnips) or cereal grains (wheat or rye). The biggest factors are #1 - timing of rain and #2 - the availability of sunlight. If you don't get regular rain...the seed can germinate and quickly die. The other thing holds true with sun light and possibly delaying germination and thus plant development. When I have had my "not so great results"....it was because of these factors. When I have had the best results....these factors went in my favor. I do this as a "icing on the cake" sort of planting a "bonus" if you will. If you are planning on doing this as a significant addition to your program I would NOT do this based on the hit/miss results you can have as I have outlined above. Having a crop that "dries down" sooner to give you more light and the like will help as well. But in my application the standing crop was the primary food source so I put my resources into that crop performing as well as possible. This is just what I have done....
     
  3. SwampCat

    SwampCat Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    SW AR
    Hardiness Zone:
    7
    I have broadcast wheat into soybeans Just before leaf drop and it does great - as long as you get some rain. I have also broadcast wheat into durana clover and then clip the clover and it does well, also.
     
    catscratch likes this.
  4. Dot3

    Dot3 New Member

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    Location:
    NE NC
    Hardiness Zone:
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    I’m treating this like “icing on the cake” too. I tried it last year after the cotton was picked (late oct) with wheat and oats. To be Honest I think the turkeys looted a lot of it. It was a last minute decision but next year I’m going to try to time for just before defoliant. I’ve researched the timing of that and whether defoliant has an effect on wheat OR crimson clover and for the purpose of feeding deer, it appears to have zero effect. Haven’t tried broadcasting into beans yet. But I am surprised that y’all have been so successful with cereal grains. I will try the grains again this year as opposed to crimson clover. I wanted to talk to the farmer about crimson and being able to burn it down but sounds like if I time it right, the grains should come up.
     
  5. catscratch

    catscratch Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Kansas It's better to wear out than to rust out.
    Exactly my experience too!

    Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
     
  6. Elkaddict

    Elkaddict Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Catskills, NY
    I broad cast brassicas into corn. Because I don’t use a planter, there always thin spots. I throw the seed down and nature does it’s thing. Deer eat em up in between corn. I find germination is always slower and at a lower rate so I try to plant earlier, and at a heavier rate than if I were going to cultipack.
     

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