Another wild pear.

Discussion in 'Fruit Trees' started by Rockhound, Oct 18, 2019.

  1. Rockhound

    Rockhound New Member

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    Location:
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    Hardiness Zone:
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    I found this tree on our farm 6 or 7 years ago here in southern middle TN. I've always planned on releasing it but other things have taken priority, I am planning on doing it in February. It always has a nice crop, and holds late. I found 4 pears on the ground (the limbs are full) yesterday and got them for seed. They have an awesome taste, very sweet, just a little hard. I'm gonna try to get a few of these going if I can, any tips from growing pear from seed?
     
  2. Rockhound

    Rockhound New Member

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    Location:
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    Hardiness Zone:
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    I cant get pics to upload
     
  3. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    Sent you a pm
     
  4. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    Rockhound’s pics
     

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  5. Rockhound

    Rockhound New Member

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    Location:
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    Hardiness Zone:
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    Thanks!
     
  6. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    That's an Asian Pear (Pyrus pyrifolia). They are sometimes called "Apple Pears." Many of them taste very good, and there are several named cultivars of them. Olympic Giant, Gallaway and Shinko are examples of an Asian Pear cultivars.
     
  7. Rockhound

    Rockhound New Member

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    Location:
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    Thanks for the info, this tree had to of grown from seed, so I'm assuming seed from the fruit would produce the same tree?
     
  8. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    No, it won't be exactly the same. The seed are a result of two parents. You don't know what the other parent was, and the offspring could have varying traits of each. Pear species will readily cross pollinate. It's a crap shoot. However, there is a good likelihood that at least some of the offspring would be very similar to your mother tree. If you end up with undesirable trees from the seed, you could always topwork them to a known cultivar later on.
     

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