Annual rye grass

Discussion in 'Food Plots for Wildlife' started by Creek chub, Sep 17, 2019.

  1. Creek chub

    Creek chub Active Member

    Messages:
    309
    Likes Received:
    55
    Location:
    Virginia
    I’m considering planting annual rye grass on some roads and my wood lot. These areas are sandy and rocky and I’m basically looking for erosion control and the ability to drive over them in wet conditions. Should I add red clover or go straight rye? Or another seeding option?
     
  2. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,059
    Likes Received:
    3,137
    Location:
    Kentucky (Zone 6B)
    Annual rye grass will mostly be gone in one year. With hard and rocky ground like you describe very few of the seed that fall from the plants will even germinate. Annual means it has to come back from seed every year, so you end up with nothing.

    For roads and erosion control, plant KY31 Fescue instead. It is the toughest perennial grass you could grow in Virginia. Don't listen to the old fables that it will become invasive and spread everywhere. That doesn't happen. It is aggressive where it is planted, but doesn't start popping up everywhere nearby and taking over everything like they teach in school these days. Some of that ignorant stuff from the so called experts just needs to be ignored.

    Best wishes....
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2019
    Creek chub likes this.
  3. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    980
    Likes Received:
    482
    Location:
    Hawaii/North Carolina
    Hardiness Zone:
    6b
    I've had mixed results on logging roads. I spent way too much money on annual and perennial rye two years ago. I've tried mixing red clover on those same roads and the only thing I've learned is that the specific site matters. Some areas are still bare dirt, others are lush red clover.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Creek chub likes this.
  4. j-bird

    j-bird Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,499
    Likes Received:
    1,644
    Location:
    Decatur county, IN Zone 6a
    Roads can be difficult because in many cases they have been graded and as such the soil tends to not be the best (top soil stripped away). Sunlight exposure, drainage and even the soil type can vary quite a bit. For erosion control....fescue is the answer. It's what it was designed to do and it's very good at it. It will also tolerate some abuse as well. It might spread some...but just keeping an eye on it and some gly or cleth will kill it where you don't want it. I personally don't like having clover on my trails because I don't want the deer to associate them as feeding areas. Some use trails as long narrow plots and that is fine as long as you are not using them during the hunting season for access.

    Just keep in mind grass is a plant too so it has it's needs to perform well also....just like a plot of clover or the like.
     
    Chainsaw, Jason Broom and Creek chub like this.
  5. Creek chub

    Creek chub Active Member

    Messages:
    309
    Likes Received:
    55
    Location:
    Virginia
    Thanks for all the feedback.

    Due to fescue seed cost, lack of rain and a short window before projected first frost, I may just use annual rye now and attempt a fescue planting in the spring.
     
  6. j-bird

    j-bird Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,499
    Likes Received:
    1,644
    Location:
    Decatur county, IN Zone 6a
    get some winter rye or winter wheat down on it now.... it will hopefully germinate enough to survive and then grow come spring....that way you don;t have bare dirt some the spring rains.....
     
    Creek chub and Jeff H like this.
  7. Jeff H

    Jeff H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    805
    Likes Received:
    480
    Location:
    Springfield, Mo Land in Ozark Mo
    I think this ^^ is a great idea. Rye will grow in the truck bed and give you some OM to work with next year.
     
    Creek chub likes this.
  8. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,429
    Likes Received:
    938
    Location:
    East Texas
    Pretty obvious what the problem is there, the top pic still has topsoil, the bottom is a 3’/4’ cut and what’s on top now has nothing in it to support growth. If you want growth on your roads save your topsoil. Some of mine are rocked, but the ones that I like best are the ones that are grassed over. Less noise !
     
  9. THE LLC

    THE LLC Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,746
    Likes Received:
    1,101
    Location:
    Georgia
    NEVER use ryegrass. Trust me. Seeds will stick to everything and you inadvertently spread it to good ground. Then you are SCREWED.
     
  10. Cap'n

    Cap'n Active Member

    Messages:
    333
    Likes Received:
    176
    Location:
    Okla. City
    I agree, K31 is one tough grass. once its established it will hold your soil in place. and it can be grown in sun and shade. The only real problem with it is if it isn't a thick stand of grass it can be very difficult to walk in because it gets clumpy. Kind of like walking through Lovegrass.
    In the NTEP (National turf evaluation Program) K31 serves as the control for the test. That's because it has great genetic color, is drought and heat resistant, has great cold tolerance and early spring green up. With the price of annual rye this year you'd spend about the same money for something that would be gone by June.
     
    Creek chub likes this.
  11. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,059
    Likes Received:
    3,137
    Location:
    Kentucky (Zone 6B)
    Yep..

    [​IMG]
     
  12. deer patch

    deer patch Active Member

    Messages:
    383
    Likes Received:
    121
    Location:
    Arkansas
    I drilled rye grain into my interior road system on September 7th and it has been dry since but the forecast looks promising for the next 10 days. I didn't plant any clover because I did not want the deer using the roads for feeding. I can report back later or next spring to let you know how it did.

    I did drill a short 40 ft strip of the same road system with grain sorghum just to empty the drill and I was surprised that it actually grew pretty good but never did make a seed head but would work for erosion, just not very practical.

    I agree with not wanting to plant something that would have potential of making it into a plot unless it was something I wanted in them anyway.
     
  13. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    980
    Likes Received:
    482
    Location:
    Hawaii/North Carolina
    Hardiness Zone:
    6b
    Both deep cuts and both in bad shape with no real top soil. I was very surprised how well the MRC took in this hill. Obviously better conditions than the other spot, I think the shade actually helps when the soil is that bad.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  14. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,429
    Likes Received:
    938
    Location:
    East Texas
    I hope shade helps, if it doesn’t then I just planted two plots that will be wasted:)
     
  15. Creek chub

    Creek chub Active Member

    Messages:
    309
    Likes Received:
    55
    Location:
    Virginia
    The roads that I’m thinking about planting aren’t near any current plots. I mainly use the road to access firewood in the winter. At times, sloppy conditions exist where there is bare dirt. K31 sounds like what I need to go with long term. If planting conditions were better right now, I’d definitely give it a try. I did buy a 40# bag off annual rye grass today for $35. I know it’ll be gone by early summer but maybe it’ll stabilize the road now with the intent of burning or discing the rye next spring, hopefully killing most of it.
     
  16. THE LLC

    THE LLC Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,746
    Likes Received:
    1,101
    Location:
    Georgia
    Be careful, because I'm telling you, those seeds will NOT be gone. That stuff is an aggressive re-seeder. Only takes one or two in a food plot. Don't ask me how I know.
     
    Creek chub likes this.
  17. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,429
    Likes Received:
    938
    Location:
    East Texas
    Mowing, even driving down the roads with full, ripe seed heads will spread the seed where it’s unwanted. No rye grass problems here, but behia grass is rampant in East Texas. Good for nothing IMO, but I don’t own cows. Still, it’s inferior to any strains of Bermuda grass, but it propagates like whoda thunk it. With tiny seeds that look like black pepper, you gather thousands of them every time you drive through it, especially when dew is on the ground. These are then deposited somewhere you don’t want them. That’s how it became the roadside grass dejeur all over my area. That, and folks hauling hay down the highway. I have to kill it every year on the state R. O. W. in front of my place.
     
    Baker and Creek chub like this.
  18. Deadeye

    Deadeye Active Member

    Messages:
    284
    Likes Received:
    116
    Location:
    Central Florida with Hunting Lease in NW Florida
    Hardiness Zone:
    8-10
    Bhaia is the Natural Grass that grows the best here in Florida. You are correct that he Seed Heads will continue to Re-Seed itself constantly.

    I went from St Augustine Grass, due to a 2nd Hard Frost killing it off, to doing a Seeding of Bahia on my yard. Over a period of several years along with an Bi-Annual Seeding my yard has become a thick full nice yard of grass.

    Interestingly the State of Florida uses Bahia to Water Cannon seed the sides of the road after Road Work. At night you will see Deer along the sides of the roads eating it happily. Turkeys also are in it all the time during the day.

    The Stuff grows everywhere and I'm starting to wonder if it has a sort of Bad Rap due to No One thinking it is a good seed to use for Deer. I am seriuosly thinking about putting some down on some of my areas to see if it helps where almost nothing wants to grow.
     
  19. Creek chub

    Creek chub Active Member

    Messages:
    309
    Likes Received:
    55
    Location:
    Virginia
    Sounds rye grass is a vegetative equivalent of cockroaches. Where I’m considering planting this stuff there are no perennial plots, for now anyways. Maybe if I decide to use it and aggressively apply gly a couple times in conjunction with discing, I could eradicate it in a few years
     
  20. Turkish

    Turkish Active Member

    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    40
    Location:
    MS
    You think the deer are eating bahiagrass?
     

Share This Page

(moderators are listed in blue)