24db and buckwheat

Discussion in 'Food Plots for Wildlife' started by Buckbuilder, May 31, 2019.

  1. Buckbuilder

    Buckbuilder Member

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    I'm guessing it will kill it ?
     
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  2. Cap'n

    Cap'n Active Member

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    Not sure about 24db on it. but 24d amine would injure it because it isn't a grass plant like wheat although the name would make you think it is. If 24db is safe to use on it it should be on the label.
     
  3. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    2,4-DB will smoke it. There's no broadleaf herbicide that will work for buckwheat. Poast Ultra works for grass control in buckwheat, although I'm not sure why anyone would spend the money. Weeds in buckwheat are controlled by using glyphosate burndown before planting, and tillage before planting is also effective. Buckwheat has a reputation of outgrowing weeds, and is used as a cover crop and soil builder, because it can leave more phosphorus in the soil after harvest than it requires to grow. Buckwheat is one of my favorite soil building crops, especially as a nurse crop for clover in new plots that are being converted from woods.
    P.S. be careful with using broadleaf herbicides that have carryover on the crop preceding buckwheat, this will be a problem.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2019
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  4. Buckbuilder

    Buckbuilder Member

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    Thanks for info
     
  5. Kabic

    Kabic Active Member

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    Where does this extra phosphorous come from? Does it fix it out of the air or does it really just mine it from a deeper soil level and leave it leave at a more accessible depth.
     
  6. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Buckwheat has the ability to accumulate insoluble phosphorus in poor soil conditions and once decomposed, it releases this phosphorus to the soil in plant-available form, ready for use by the next crop. I would almost sooner buy a $38 dollar 50 lb bag of buckwheat seed than a ton of phosphorus fertilizer for a new food plot.
     
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  7. Jon

    Jon Member

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    Mennoniteman has stated it right. I'm a big buckwheat fan, my practice for dealing with weeds for buckwheat has been live and let live... I tend to till the ground several times allowing regrowth then cultivating to kill regrowth before I plant. Buckwheat typically outcompetes most weeds, but I still have issues with grasses and I am not a big herbicide person. So I have no practical experience with dealing with herbicides and buckwheat... but I found an article that speaks to this topic.

    https://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/pdfplus/10.4141/P98-104
     
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  8. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Some good info there.
     
  9. Buckbuilder

    Buckbuilder Member

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    Looks like desmedipham is being banned?
     
  10. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    The EU has banned it. When I was young there were honeybees everywhere, now there isn't a bee in our county, they are gone, and the US government is pretending they don't have a clue why they disappeared. Meanwhile, the Europeans think that they have found the cause. neonicotinoid pesticides, and several others. You'd think that people would see the honeybees as the canary in the coal mine but nobody seems to be very alarmed. The EU has banned significantly more chemicals than the u.s., and I think we should be paying attention to which products they are banning and follow suit if warranted.
     
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