2020 Corn Planting

Discussion in 'Food Plots for Wildlife' started by cutman, Mar 19, 2020.

  1. cutman

    cutman Administrator Staff Member

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    Location:
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    It’s go time this weekend. I’m going to plant 12 acres of field corn and about .75 acres of sweet corn.

    The field corn is going to be no till planted into this rye:



    The sweet corn is going here and will be fenced:

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    Supplies were delivered yesterday.

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    I love corn planting weekend.

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  2. BoneCrusher20

    BoneCrusher20 Member

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    Location:
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    Holy smokes already. Where you at. I still got snow on the fields. Wish I was getting some diesel therapy about now.


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  3. Bowhunter

    Bowhunter Active Member

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    Look forward to see how your corn turns out this year. I enjoy following along every year.
     
  4. j-bird

    j-bird Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    we are still a little out yet from planting corn here....but I can imagine the soil temps are much high in SC vs IN right now. Good luck....12 to 13 acres with a 2 row is a lot of passes! That is potentially a lot of sweet corn!
     
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  5. cutman

    cutman Administrator Staff Member

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    Soil temps are in the mid-60s here but will most likely be cooler under all that rye. Soil moisture is perfect though, heat and rain are in the forecast, and Easter is almost here. Corn planting time.

    Yes...12-13 acres with a 2 row will take a lot of passes. Probably 12 hours on Saturday. Then I will need to spray the rye to terminate it, so it will be a couple of long days.
     
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  6. MarkDarvin

    MarkDarvin Well-Known Member

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    Ufda! What's on all those pallets?
     
  7. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    You could have grounds to make an argument for the necessity of swapping that nice 2 row max-emerge planter in for a nice 4 row.
     
  8. cutman

    cutman Administrator Staff Member

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    15-0-15 is the starter fertilizer that goes in the planter. We went through 100 bags of that yesterday. 34-0-0 will be top dressed when the corn is about a foot tall.

    I’m pooped. It was a 12 hour day yesterday and a couple more hours today to finish spraying. I had to repair a boom on the sprayer this morning before I could start again.

    IMG_9869.JPG

    I’m worried about how this crop is going to turn out because the rye was too thick. I should have terminated it a couple of weeks ago (or sooner). I guess we will find out before long.

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  9. Elkaddict

    Elkaddict Well-Known Member

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    Pics are amazing. My rye is just starting to turn a lil green. Of course, we are forecast to get a foot of snow the next few days.... At least the temps are inching up...we had sunny 35 degrees today:)
     
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  10. dogghr

    dogghr Well-Known Member

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    Always enjoy your corn planting season. I really thot u had a big notill for planting. I got tired just thinking of your work. Hopefully drought don’t come like last year for you.
    Do you broadcast grain into harvested corn or use the planter again? Thanks for showing. My grains are about 3 inches high.


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  11. cutman

    cutman Administrator Staff Member

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    I use a no till (Great Plains 706NT) drill for everything other than corn. I pick the corn (1 row picker), bush hog the remaining stalks, then drill right through it.
     
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  12. DrDirtNap

    DrDirtNap Active Member

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    Cutman, tell me about that one row picker...I just figured you left the corn standing for wildlife.
     
  13. cutman

    cutman Administrator Staff Member

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    New Idea 1 row picker. Supposedly the most dangerous piece of farm equipment ever invented. I have a healthy respect for it.

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  14. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    So, what makes it dangerous ?
     
  15. cutman

    cutman Administrator Staff Member

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    A million moving parts, chains, belts, and whirly gigs. It’s supposedly very easy for clothes to get caught up in it and sucked in, which often results in the loss of an appendage.
     
  16. MarkDarvin

    MarkDarvin Well-Known Member

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    Man, that seems a common theme with all the old farm machinery. Our feed grinder was the same way with endless moving parts, belts, augers, and shafts. Farm accidents know no limit. Grandpa lost a hand in the baler, uncle Francis lost 6 fingers in the combine, my history teacher had a cultivator wing land on him and smash his knee. Another uncle lost a finger to a pressure washer.

    I know I've asked this before but don't remember, but what do you do with the corn once it's picked?
     
  17. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I knew that, I had a senior moment :( I was raised on a dairy and daddy raised peanuts too. I was scared to even walk by a peanut thrasher when it was running. It would shake and vibrate with gears spinning 100 mph, I was always scared something would spin off and take my head off. :)

    You know, folks didn’t much think in those terms back in the day. It was just work, and that’s all they knew.
     
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  18. DrDirtNap

    DrDirtNap Active Member

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    Location:
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    I remember my dad and grandad running one of those one row ear pickers....if i remember correctly they would work on it more than they would use it. Yours looks alot newer than the one they had. Do they still make those one row ear pickers?
     
  19. cutman

    cutman Administrator Staff Member

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    I think New Idea stopped making them in 1965 or something. Luckily it’s still possible to find parts, and I found a manual for it online. I spend lots of time working on it as well. Crap gets stuck in it and the chains fall off.
     
  20. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    New Idea built the first manure spreader that actually spread manure (unlike some people thinking it was the democrats) and a lot of other innovative farm machinery like the Cut/Ditioner haybine through their heyday in the 70's. Company founder Joe Oppenheim was a school teacher who noticed that some boys were missing school because they were helping spreading manure in the fields by hand, and he invented the angled paddles that sling the manure by watching the boys play paddle ball. The neighbors called the manure spreader "Joe's new idea" and that's where the company name came from.
     
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