2019 Eagle Beans

Discussion in 'Food Plots for Wildlife' started by cutman, May 9, 2019.

  1. cutman

    cutman Administrator Staff Member

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    I’ve never really messed with Eagle soybeans because my deer decimate them immediately. This year I decided to put a Plotsaver fence up and try again.

    So far so good. I already sprayed once and probably won’t have to again. If it ever rains again these things will take off.

    IMG_7802.JPG

    IMG_7803.JPG



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  2. Jack Terpack

    Jack Terpack Active Member

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    Do hogs bother them at all?
     
  3. cutman

    cutman Administrator Staff Member

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    Don’t have any.
     
  4. Baker

    Baker Well-Known Member

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    I've never planted Eagle soybeans. I feel certain they are very good and as I understand it they are a vining soybean that will grow to frost. It is also my pre conceived notion that they are expensive compared to regular soybeans or cow peas. So my question is what value do Eagle soybeans have over iron clay cowpeas?
     
  5. Jeff H

    Jeff H Well-Known Member

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    I have had good luck with the Plot Saver fence. Last time I used it with a mix of vining beans, milo, sunflower, clover. They finally figured out the fence smell was worth the prize on the other side but by then my beans had taken off and hidden by everything else.
     
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  6. shawn cox

    shawn cox Active Member

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    The advantage is that they handle extreme browsing pressure and put out more tonnage according to the company. I have planted them and they hold up way better to browsing and put off way more tonnage than iron and clay peas. However, I don't use them anymore because they are over $100 a bag. Another plus is that they are RUP ready. You have to have your Monsato number on file to buy them or at least you did when I used them.
     
  7. cutman

    cutman Administrator Staff Member

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    Not sure, Rusty. It was nice that I was able to spray them with glyphosate, but I typically don’t need to worry about spraying cowpeas anyway. This is only a 2.5 acre plot so not too expensive.

    I’m most interested to see how the famous Eagle beans do once the deer starting eating them...
     
  8. Baker

    Baker Well-Known Member

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    Interesting and is the response I expected. I will probably never plant them as a) I plant large enough fields that the deer cant consume the tonnage available, b) I do not spray glyphosate on standing crops deer eat nor will I patronize Monsanto with anything c) I'm not going to pay $100/#50 when cow peas cost me $48 [ and this year they are more expensive than normal ] d) I terminate my summer annual fields in Sept. thus nullifying the advantages of having Eagle beans go to frost which is typically around Nov 15 in our neighborhood

    Nonetheless I'm sure they are very good and will do everything advertised
     
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  9. shawn cox

    shawn cox Active Member

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    yes they are not needed on your place. You do a great job. Loved the video you just put up. One day I will hopefully have a crimper and a no till drill.
     
  10. shawn cox

    shawn cox Active Member

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    They will hold up great to browsing.
     
  11. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    I've planted both, and for my money, the only advantage of Eagle beans is that you might get an actual stand of beans, thus negating the need to replace them with a fall crop. I planted them two years, had beans once, but not the other. I like IC peas better for the reasons Rusty mentioned. As Cutman said, I've not had much trouble with weeds or grasses in IC peas (once I got rid of the pigweed I had).
     
  12. cutman

    cutman Administrator Staff Member

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    IMG_7854.JPG

    Fence is still working. We got 0.5” of rain Sunday but have no more in the forecast. We will see how drought tolerant these really are.

    One bonus of spraying the fence this week - I almost stepped on a brand new fawn that was bedded down about 3 feet from the fence. I thought it was a rabbit when it jumped up.


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  13. Sir Miss A Lot

    Sir Miss A Lot Member

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    Location:
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    Good thread. Gotta keep track of this one. I planted 2 types of Forage Beans this year and am excited to see how they hold up. However, I don't plant plots near the size that yall do. Keep the pics coming.
     
  14. SwampCat

    SwampCat Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    They are roundup ready - and for me - they with stand more grazing pressure than iron clay cow peas. Yes they are expensive - about $90 per fifty pound bag for one acre. Regular ag beans wont make it past a foot tall on my ground in less than five acre plots
     
  15. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Huntingdon Co. PA
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    My biggest hang up with eagle beans is that they feed the deer over the middle of the summer here when, unlike the south, we have deer food in vast abundance in zone 6b, but the eagle beans don't do much for late fall, winter, and early spring. According to the so called deer experts, providing abundant food in midsummer turns your property into a deer factory. I don't know that I subscribe to that philosophy, but my planting efforts are mostly directed towards fall, winter and spring food. I always have plenty of ladino clover around for summer food, if I mess with beans it's ag beans to try to grow bean pods for the next winter. Fall food is brassica. Winter and early spring food in snow country is cereal rye.
     
  16. THE LLC

    THE LLC Well-Known Member

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    Not liking the looks of our forecasts the rest of May. I HATE drought. Nothing more depressing.
     
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  17. weekender21

    weekender21 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, pretty dang dry across the SE.
     
  18. Sir Miss A Lot

    Sir Miss A Lot Member

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    My Eagle seed Beans are coming up great, they are getting some browse pressure. I planted some Laredos, they didn't come up, I was slightly disappointed.
     
  19. SwampCat

    SwampCat Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    Hardiness Zone:
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    I am not sure wet isnt worse than dry. 12” of rain here in Apr and so far 11” of rain in May with more coming. Cant get a tractor in the field. Bottoms flooded, cant plant anything, trails are a muddy mess. Usually you folks in the SE get the rain we have here in Arkansas - but this year it seems like it is going north of you.
     
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  20. cutman

    cutman Administrator Staff Member

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    We are going to see how drought tolerant these beans are. We’ve had very little rain since December, very little rain (none) in the forecast, and summer heat has arrived. Going to suck watching my beautiful corn crop and my $117/bag beans whither away.
     
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